National Down Syndrome Month on October, 2018: what causes a baby to be born with down syndrome?

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October, 2018 is National Down Syndrome Month 2018. Love life and be gentle: September 2012 be born with Down syndrome

what causes a baby to be born with down syndrome?

***********This is everything you need to know; I found the information on marchofdimes.com.*************

Down Syndrome

What is Down syndrome?

Down syndrome is a chromosomal disorder that includes a combination of birth defects. Affected individuals have some degree of mental retardation, characteristic facial features and, often, heart defects and other health problems. The severity of these problems varies greatly among affected individuals.

How common is Down syndrome?

Down syndrome is one of the most common genetic birth defects, affecting about 1 in 800 babies. According to the National Down Syndrome Society, there are approximately 350,000 individuals with Down syndrome in the United States.

What causes Down syndrome?

Down syndrome is caused by extra genetic material from chromosome 21. Chromosomes are the structures in cells that contain the genes.

Each person normally has 23 pairs of chromosomes, or 46 in all. An individual inherits one chromosome per pair from the mother's egg and one from the father's sperm. When an egg and sperm cell join together, they normally form a fertilized egg with 46 chromosomes.

Sometimes something goes wrong before fertilization. A developing egg or sperm cell may divide incorrectly, sometimes resulting in an egg or sperm cell with an extra chromosome number 21. When this cell joins with a normal egg or sperm cell, the resulting embryo has 47 chromosomes instead of 46. Down syndrome also is called trisomy 21 because affected individuals have three number 21 chromosomes, instead of two. This type of error in cell division causes about 95 percent of the cases of Down syndrome.

Occasionally, before fertilization, a part of chromosome 21 breaks off during cell division and becomes attached to another chromosome in the egg or sperm cell. The resulting embryo may have what is called translocation Down syndrome. Affected individuals have two normal copies of chromosome 21 plus extra chromosome 21 material attached to another chromosome. This type of error in cell division causes about 3 to 4 percent of the cases of Down syndrome. In some cases, the parent has a rearrangement of chromosome 21, called a balanced translocation, which does not affect his or her health.

About 1 to 2 percent of individuals with Down syndrome have a form called mosaicism. In this form, the error in cell division occurs after fertilization. Affected individuals have some cells with an extra chromosome 21 and others with the normal number.

What health problems might a child or adult with Down syndrome have?

The outlook for individuals with Down syndrome is far brighter than it once was. Most of the health problems associated with Down syndrome can be treated, and life expectancy is now about 55 years. Individuals with Down syndrome are more likely than unaffected individuals to have one or more of the following health conditions:

Heart defects. Almost half of babies with Down syndrome have heart defects. Some defects are minor and may be treated with medications, while others require surgery. All babies with Down syndrome should be examined by a pediatric cardiologist, a doctor who specializes in heart diseases of children, and have an echocardiogram (a special ultrasound examination of the heart) in the first two months of life so that heart defects can be treated.

Intestinal defects. About 12 percent of babies with Down syndrome are born with intestinal malformations that require surgery (3).

Vision problems. More than 60 percent of children with Down syndrome have vision problems, including crossed eyes (esotropia), near- or far-sightedness and cataracts. Glasses, surgery or other treatments usually can improve vision. A child with Down syndrome should be examined by a pediatric ophthalmologist (eye doctor) within the first six months of life and have regular vision exams.

Hearing loss. About 75 percent of children with Down syndrome have some hearing loss. Hearing loss may be due to fluid in the middle ear (which may be temporary), a nerve or both. Babies with Down syndrome should be screened for hearing loss at birth or by 3 months of age. They also should have regular hearing exams so any problems can be treated before they hinder development of language and other skills.

Infections. Children with Down syndrome tend to have many colds and ear infections, as well as bronchitis and pneumonia. Children with Down syndrome should receive all the standard childhood immunizations, which help prevent some of these infections.

Thyroid problems, leukemia and seizures, Memory loss. Individuals with Down syndrome are more likely than unaffected individuals to develop Alzheimer's disease (characterized by progressive memory loss, personality changes and other problems). Adults with Down syndrome tend to develop Alzheimer's disease at an earlier age than unaffected individuals. Studies suggest that about 25 percent of adults with Down syndrome over age 35 have

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Why does Sarah Palin constantly use her child with Down Syndrome in the national media?

Why does Sarah Palin constantly use her child with Down Syndrome in the national media?

First, let me say that I have worked with children with special needs for a while now. About 7 of the last 9 years. One of my favorite periods was 8 months when I worked one on one with a child with Down syndrome. With that being said, saying that I wish for special needs children to be out of sight/out of mind would be ludicrous. But, here is the deal... she may not realize she is coming across this way, but Sarah Palin is very much coming across, even to me, as if she sometimes uses her child as a fulcrum for media attention. There is a difference between trying to raise general awareness and acceptance of children with special needs and using it as a political tool, as she has recently.

Can an individual with Asperger Syndrome join the national guard?

Can an individual with Asperger Syndrome join the national guard?

AR 40-501 (standards of medical fitness)

2–27. Learning, psychiatric and behavioral disorders

a. Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (314), or Perceptual/Learning Disorder(s)

(315) does not meet the standard, unless applicant can demonstrate passing academic performance and there has been

no use of medication(s) in the previous 12 months.

b. Current or history of academic skills or perceptual defects (315) secondary to organic or functional mental disorders, including, but not limited to dyslexia, that interfere with school or employment, do not meet the standard. Applicants demonstrating passing academic and employment performance without utilization or recommendation of

academic and/or work accommodations at any time in the previous 12 months may be qualified.

c. Current or history of disorders with psychotic features such as schizophrenia (295), paranoid disorder (297), and other unspecified psychosis (298) does not meet the standard.

d. Current mood disorders including, but not limited to, major depression (296.2–3), bipolar (296.4–7), affective psychoses (296.8–9), depressive not otherwise specified (311), do not meet the standard.

(1) History of mood disorders requiring outpatient care for longer than 6 months by a physician or other mental health professional (V65.40), or inpatient treatment in a hospital or residential facility does not meet the standard.

(2) History of symptoms consistent with a mood disorder of a repeated nature that impairs school, social, or work efficiency does not meet the standard.

e. Current or history of adjustment disorders (309) within the previous 3 months does not meet the standard.

f. Current or history of conduct (312), or behavior (313) disorders does not meet the standard. Recurrent encounters with law enforcement agencies, antisocial attitudes or behaviors are tangible evidence of impaired capacity to adapt to military service and as such do not meet the standard.

g. Current or history of personality disorder (301) does not meet the standard. History (demonstrated by repeated inability to maintain reasonable adjustment in school, with employers or fellow workers, or other social groups), interview, or psychological testing revealing that the degree of immaturity, instability, personality inadequacy, impulsiveness, or dependency will likely interfere with adjustment in the Armed Forces does not meet the standard.

h. Current or history of other behavior disorders does not meet the standard, including, but not limited to conditions such as the following:

(1) Enuresis (307.6) or encopresis (307.7) after 13th birthday does not meet the standard.

(2) Sleepwalking (307.4) after 13th birthday does not meet the standard.

(3) Eating disorders (307.5), anorexia nervosa (307.1), bulimia (307.51), or unspecified disorders of eating (307.59)

lasting longer than 3 months and occurring after 13th birthday do not meet the standard.

i. Any current receptive or expressive language disorder, including, but not limited to any speech impediment,stammering and stuttering (307.0) of such a degree as to significantly interfere with production of speech or to repeat commands, does not meet the standard.

j. History of suicidal behavior, including gesture(s) or attempt(s) (300.9), or history of self-mutilation, does not meet the standard.

k. Current or history of anxiety disorders (anxiety (300.01) or panic (300.2)), agoraphobia (300.21), social phobia

(300.23), simple phobias (300.29), obsessive-compulsive (300.3), other acute reactions to stress (308), and posttraumatic stress disorder (309.81) do not meet the standard.

l. Current or history of dissociative disorders, including, but not limited to hysteria (300.1), depersonalization (300.

6), and other (300.8), do not meet the standard.

m. Current or history of somatoform disorders, including, but not limited to hypochondriasis (300.7) or chronic pain disorder, do not meet the standard.

n. Current or history of psychosexual conditions (302), including, but not limited to transsexualism, exhibitionism,

transvestism, voyeurism, and other paraphilias, do not meet the standard.

o. Current or history of alcohol dependence (303), drug dependence (304), alcohol abuse (305), or other drug abuse (305.2 thru 305.9) does not meet the standard.

p. Current or history of other mental disorders (all 290–319 not listed above) that in the opinion of the civilian or military provider will interfere with, or prevent satisfactory performance of military duty, do not meet the standard.

no, you do not meet the standard, you cannot enlist.

@ann- First off, I cited the reference at the top of the regulation where it belongs. Secondly, you are a poser who was never an MD or a psychiatrist, as you have proven several times. You are a poser, a hack, and a fraud.

Also on this date Monday, October 1, 2018...