National Crime Prevention Month on October, 2018: august trivia contest.whoever can help me with the most answers first gets 10 points!?

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October, 2018 is National Crime Prevention Month 2018.

august trivia contest...whoever can help me with the most answers first gets 10 points!?

1. Augustus Ceaser

2. Woodstock

3. National Night Out

4. Swim the English Channel

5. August 6 National Salvadoran-American Day (US)

August has no actual National Holiday in the U S

Amazon Gold Box

What are some national humane laws that were passed within the past year? 10 pts?

What are some national humane laws that were passed within the past year? 10 pts?

States Pass Record Number of Animal Protection Laws in 2008

December 4, 2008

The year 2008 was an historic year for animals in state lawmaking. The Humane Society of the United States worked on a wide range of animal protection policy reforms, such as increasing penalties to crack down on animal fighting, making meaningful progress on combating puppy mills and prohibiting the inhumane confinement of farm animals. The nation's largest animal protection organization ushered in a whole new era of policies for animals by helping to pass 91 new animal protection laws this year, surpassing the previous record number of 86 new laws enacted in 2007.

"We commend state lawmakers for passing this raft of legislation to protect animals from cruelty and abuse," said Michael Markarian, executive vice president of The Humane Society of the United States. "The anti-cruelty laws of a state are a reflection of our basic values and attitudes toward animals, and this record year and collection of bills represent a measurable step forward for animals all across the country." While there were many successes around the country, The Humane Society of the United States offers up its list of the 12 most significant victories of the year:

California: Proposition 2

The Prevention of Farm Animal Cruelty Act, known as Prop. 2, is widely regarded as the most ambitious ballot measure for animals ever undertaken in the United States. And on Nov. 4, 63.5 percent of California voters approved this measure to halt the practice of confining veal calves, egg-laying hens and breeding pigs in crates and cages so small the animals can barely move.

Colorado: Farm Animal Welfare

The HSUS negotiated with leaders in Colorado's animal agriculture industry and key lawmakers to improve the lives of farm animals. As a result, Colorado became the first state to ban both the use of both veal crates and gestation crates through its state legislature.

Delaware: Fur Labeling

Delaware became the fourth state in the nation to require the labeling of garments containing animal fur. An investigation by The HSUS found that unlabeled jackets were falsely advertised and sold as faux fur, even though testing revealed that the garments actually contained real fur from raccoon dogs and other animals.

Georgia: Dogfighting

In the aftermath of the Michael Vick case, more than 25 states considered legislation in 2008 to crack down on animal fighting. Until this year, Georgia was ranked as having one of the worst dogfighting laws in the country. But state lawmakers worked to close gaps in the law by banning the possession of a dog with the intent to fight, and making it a crime to be a spectator at a dogfight. The HSUS now places Georgia among the states with the strongest dogfighting laws.

Idaho: Dogfighting

In February, animal advocates celebrated another victory when Idaho became the 49th state to make dogfighting a felony.

Louisiana: Puppy Mills

Puppy mills are breeding facilities that treat dogs like cash crops and typically house dogs in squalid and overcrowded conditions. One of our biggest legislative victories against this industry was in Louisiana, where the legislature passed precedent-setting legislation that placed an actual limit on the number of dogs kept by breeders, in order to prevent the operation of factory farm type breeding facilities. With this new law, breeding operations are now limited to no more than 75 adult dogs.

Massachusetts: Question 3

Last month, Massachusetts voters approved Question 3 to phase out the greyhound racing industry. At these tracks, thousands of greyhounds are forced to compete every year and endure regular confinement, kept in small cages barely large enough to stand up or turn around for 20 or more hours per day. It's expected that this sweeping victory will speed up the demise of this industry, and will also send a message to other states that dogs deserve better.

Pennsylvania: Puppy Mills

Notoriously known as the "Puppy Mill Capital of the East," the Keystone State has been tarnished with the reputation of being one of the worst puppy mill states in the nation. National television coverage highlighted the horrific conditions in the Commonwealth's puppy mills. But with efforts spearheaded by Gov. Ed Rendell, the state legislature took a strong stance against this abusive industry and passed a bill that should significantly improve the lives of thousands of dogs in Pennsylvania, and took a strong stance against this abusive industry.

Utah: Felony Cruelty

After a multi-year effort by animal protection groups, veterinarians, prosecutors and others, Utah became the 44th state with felony-level animal cruelty penalties. After hammering out a compromise bill, the legislature made the torture of a dog or cat a felony on the first offense. We look forward to working with lawmakers in Arkansas, Idaho, Mississippi, North Dakota and South Dakota to get felony animal cruelty l

Where can I find statstics and graphs on the internet that support gun ownership and gun rights?

Where can I find statstics and graphs on the internet that support gun ownership and gun rights?

Go to the NRA's website they'll give you all the SPIN you need to write your speech. Here are some FACTS though:

School Safety

Between 1994 and 1999, there were 220 school associated violent events resulting in 253 deaths - - 74.5% of these involved firearms. Handguns caused almost 60% of these deaths. (Journal of American Medical Association, December 2001)

In 1998-99 academic year, 3,523 students were expelled for bringing a firearm to school. This is a decrease from the 5,724 students expelled in 1996-97 for bringing a firearm to school. (U.S. Department of Education, October 2000)

Nearly 8% of adolescents in urban junior and senior high schools miss at least one day of school each month because they are afraid to attend. (National Mental Health & Education Center for Children & Families, National Association of School Psychologists 1998)

The National School Boards Association estimates that more than 135,000 guns are brought into U.S. schools each day. (NSBA, 1993)

Children and Gun Violence

America is losing too many children to gun violence. Between 1979 and 2001, gunfire killed 90,000 children and teens in America. (Children's Defense Fund and National Center for Health Statistics)

In one year, more children and teens died from gunfire than from cancer, pneumonia, influenza, asthma, and HIV/AIDS combined. (Children's Defense Fund)

The rate of firearm deaths among kids under age 15 is almost 12 times higher in the United States than in 25 other industrialized countries combined. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

America and Gun Violence

Every day, more than 80 Americans die from gun violence. (Coalition to Stop Gun Violence)

The rate of firearm deaths among kids under age 15 is almost 12 times higher in the United States than in 25 other industrialized countries combined. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

American kids are 16 times more likely to be murdered with a gun, 11 times more likely to commit suicide with a gun, and nine times more likely to die from a firearm accident than children in 25 other industrialized countries combined. (Centers for Disease Control)

Guns in the Wrong Hands

Americans for Gun Safety produced a 2003 report that reveals that 20 of the nation’s 22 national gun laws are not enforced. According to U.S. Department of Justice data (FY 2000-2002), only 2% of federal gun crimes were actually prosecuted. Eighty-five percent of cases prosecuted relate to street criminals in possession of firearms. Ignored are laws intended to punish illegal gun trafficking, firearm theft, corrupt gun dealers, lying on a criminal background check form, obliterating firearm serial numbers, selling guns to minors and possessing a gun in a school zone. To access The Enforcement Gap: Federal Gun Laws Ignored, visit . For a state-by-state chart of gun crimes (FY 2000-2002), click here.

Studies show that 1 percent of gun stores sell the weapons traced to 57 percent of gun crimes. According to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF), the dealer that armed the DC area sniper is among this small group of problem gun dealers that "supply the suppliers" who funnel guns to the nation's criminals. (Between 1997 and 2001, guns sold by this dealer were involved in 52 crimes, including homicides, kidnappings and assaults. Still open today, it also can't account for 238 guns or say whether they were stolen, lost or sold, or if their buyers underwent felony-background checks.) As a result, these few gun dealers have a vastly disproportionate impact on public safety. The ATF can recognize such dealers based on: (1) guns stolen from inventory; (2) missing federal sales records, needed by police to solve crimes; (3) having 10 weapons a year traced to crimes; (4) frequently selling multiple guns to individual buyers; and (5) short times between gun sales and their involvement in crimes. Yet ATF enforcement is weak due to a lack of Congressional support and resources. For more details, click here.

Terrorists have purchased firearms at gun shows, where unlicensed sellers are not currently required to conduct background checks or to ask for identification. According to the Middle East Intelligence Report, for example, a Hezbollah member was arrested in November 2000, after a nine-month investigation by the FBI's counter-terrorism unit. Ali Boumelhem was later convicted on seven counts of weapons charges and conspiracy to ship weapons and ammunition to Lebanon. Federal agents had observed Boumelhem, a resident of Detroit and Beirut, travel to Michigan gun shows and buy gun parts and ammunition for shipment overseas. Boumelhem was prohibited from legally purchasing guns as gun stores because he was a convicted felon. Additional cases involve a Pakistani national with an expired (1988) student visa; a Lebanese native and Hamas member with numerous felony convictions; and a supporter of the Irish Republican Army. (USA Today, Wednesday, November 28, 2001 Americans for Gun Safety)

According to Americans for Gun Safety (December 2002), gun theft is most likely in states without laws requiring safe storage of firearms in the home and where there are large numbers of gun owners and relatively high crime rates. Based on FBI data, nearly 1.7 million guns have been reported stolen in the past ten years, and only 40% of those were recovered. The missing guns, over 80% of which are taken from homes or cars, most likely fuel the black market for criminals. NEA, AGS and the National Rifle Association advocate for safe storage. To access "Stolen Guns: Arming the Enemy" visit www.agsfoundation.com.

The American Medical Association reports that between 36% and 50% of male eleventh graders believe that they could easily get a gun if they wanted one.

In 1998-99 academic year, 3,523 students were expelled for bringing a firearm to school. This is a decrease from the 5,724 students expelled in 1996-97 for bringing a firearm to school. (U.S. Department of Education, October 2000)

According to a report by the Joshephson Institute of Ethics (2000 Report Card: Report #1), 60% of high school and 31% of middle school boys said they could get a gun if they wanted to (April, 2001).

Also on this date Monday, October 1, 2018...