National Pork Month on October, 2018: Does anyone have a good pork tenderloine recipe for me?

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October, 2018 is National Pork Month 2018. Celebrating National Pork Month With Costco # Celebrating National Pork

Does anyone have a good pork tenderloine recipe for me?

Pork tenderloin is one of the leanest meats available, and according to the National Pork Producers' comparison chart, it's nearly as low in saturated fat as chicken breasts. The tenderloin is part of the loin, and you can usually find it sold separately in packages of two. Since there's very little fat on a tenderloin, a small amount can go a long ways, particularly in stir-fry dishes, or cut and flattened as medallions, as in the recipe below

Pork can be made more flavorful by marinating or seasoning before cooking. The main thing to remember when cooking pork tenderloins is not to overcook when roasting, since overcooking will cause the meat to dry out. It's a good idea to use a meat thermometer to test for doneness; cutting into the meat to test for color will cause too many good juices to run out.

New guidelines by the FDA and the Pork Producers of America have stated that pork should not be cooked above 145° which is still well above the 137° necessary to kill any trichinae. This should produce tenderloin that's juicy, tender, and safe.

Since tenderloin is often somewhat higher in price, look for sales and stock up! Fresh pork may be kept frozen from 3 to 6 months.

Pork Tenderloin Medallions With Spicy Marmalade Sauce

Ingredients:

12 ounces sweet orange marmalade

4 tablespoons cider vinegar

2 tablespoons honey

1 tablespoon Asian hot garlic chili sauce or a dash or more of other hot sauce

Pinch salt

2 pounds pork tenderloins

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon salt

Dash ground black pepper

Method

Combine the marmalade, vinegar, honey, Asian chili sauce, and pinch of salt. Simmer until reduced by about 1/3, about 10 to 15 minutes.

Cut tenderloins into 1-inch slices. Flatten slightly with the heel of your hand. Combine the flour, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and pepper in a food storage bag. Shake tenderloin medallions in the flour mixture until well coated.

Heat olive oil over medium-high heat in a large skillet. Sear tenderloin medallions for about 3 minutes on each side. Add the reduced sauce, cover the skillet, and simmer for about 20 minutes.

Serves 4 to 6.

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Swine flu-What happens to the Pork?

Swine flu-What happens to the Pork?

AS swine flu threatens to escalate into a global pandemic, the pig industry has moved swiftly to assure consumers that pork products remain safe to eat.

Despite its name, the swine flu virus H1N1 has not been identified in pigs and expert advice states there is currently no threat to human health from eating pigmeat.

The virus is being called ‘swine flu’ because it is similar to that found in pig herds but tests have shown it is in fact a combination of swine flu, human flu and bird flu – its proper name being Novel Human Flu Virus.

The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said it was ‘not justified’ to call it swine flu as it was not currently an animal health issue.

Robert Madelin, director general for Health and Consumer Protection in the European Commission, confirmed the virus had ‘nothing to do with the food chain.’

Speaking at a press conference in Brussels, he said: “Not only is this not a pig virus, but it is not affecting pigs, there is no human to pig transition. Pigs are not carriers. Neither pigs, nor porcine embryos, nor pigmeat.”

Despite the assurances from politicians, pig producers in the US – where there have now been 20 confirmed cases of the virus - were advised to step up biosecurity this week.

The National Pork Board (NPB) said that while the virus has not been found in pigs, scientists still know very little about the new strain and have urged producers to be cautious until more is known about the novel virus.

Steve Weaver, a California pork producer and president of the NPB said: "We share the concern of the global health community regarding the spread of this disease.

"To ensure the good health of our animals and for all those who provide care for the animals, we are urging pork producers to be vigilant in taking measures to prevent the spread of this disease."

Meanwhile, there is expected to be a knock-on effect for the meat industry as, despite the assurances of safety, meat consumption is expected to drop.

In the US, soy and corn futures suffered their biggest one-day decline in more than two months yesterday (Monday, April 27) on the back of fears over the outbreak.

Would conservatives consider a new country all of their own?

Would conservatives consider a new country all of their own?

Sadly, it would be bankrupt through mounting deficits within 3 months.

Also on this date Monday, October 1, 2018...