National Panini Month on August, 2018: Traveling around Europe for about 5 months!!!! Help me please!!!!?

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August, 2018 is National Panini Month 2018. Why Is National Panini Month In August if National Panini Month

Traveling around Europe for about 5 months!!!! Help me please!!!!?

The first thing you need to be aware of is that you do not need a visa to stay in the Schengen zone (including all the countries you mentioned except Ireland and the UK) for up to 90 days in a 180 day period. You cannot just stay 90 days, leave for a few days and then return, so at least two months of the trip would need to within Ireland/UK areas. You have between one and two weeks per country for the trip, so it's feasible, but a lot of moving around in that time. You won't be able to cover a lot of any one country, but can get a decent overview.

Other than the clothes and personal items you'll need (comfortable shoes are a must), you'll need plug adapters for any laptops, camera or cell phone chargers, etc. You'll need at least two - one for continental Europe and one for the UK since the plug types are different. If you have other items that are only designed for North american voltages and currents, you may also need a voltage converter. You can tell by reading the lable on the power supply. If it says something like Input: 100 - 240 Vac; 50/60 Hz, then you only need a plug adapter.

Here are some resources that can help you plan and check options and current prices for your trip:

- airfares & hotels; the explore function is useful for finding the less expensive places to fly into from your starting point.

- particularly good for budget flights within Europe, but you can also use everywhere as a destination to do something like the explore option on Kayak. You may not need the airfares, but you can compare to the cost of the trains to get around.

- trains throughout Europe including much more information on selecting ans using railpasses to get around if they suit your trip. It is not always best to use a pass. You need to be aware that with a railpass, you still need to make reservations for some high speed, international and night trains and there is an additional payment for that. This site will tell you how to determine whether a pass is worth the money and which pass will best suit you. It also has links to the national train sites where you can find schedules and price individual tickets. Right now, railpasses are almost never worth the cost here in Italy. The German website is one of the best resources for finding train connections throughout most of Europe: … - you'll need the other sites to price trips that don't include Germany.

- hotels/B&Bs - prices for the same hotel can vary hugely depending on the season and what local events are going on.

- hostels.

- monasteries & convents that offer accommodations

… - festivals, exhibitions and events

- information & advice

For sightseeing prices: check the websites for entrance fees for the museums & galleries you're interested in. I spend anywhere between nothing and 40 euro ($49) a day depending on exactly what I go to see when out exploring. For food, I spend around 25 to 50 euro ($31 to $62) for a meal, but you can eat for less. I was in Venice recently and paid 32 euro for lunch at Da Raffaele sitting at a canalside table with the gondolas passing by. Here in Italy, You can get a whole pizza for 8 to 13 euro ($10 - $16) or a pasta dish in the same range. Panini or pizza by the slice is less. For reference, a McDonalds McMenu classico (medium) is going for around 7.50 euro ($9.24). While you can eat cheaply most of the time, I would recommend getting a good local meal from time to time; that's part of the overall experience that it would be a shame to miss. When I travel, I like to try the local specialties and the good restaurants.

Look for local festivals during your time here. They tend to have excellent, relatively inexpensive food featuring local specialties. It's also a great way to get an insight into local culture and tradition.

Is 150$/day reasonable for a one month trip to Europe?

Is 150$/day reasonable for a one month trip to Europe?

That depends a lot on where you go and exactly when you're there; prices can vary a lot when there are special events going on. You should be able to manage on that. You can generally get by for around $100 per day staying in cheap hostels and carefully watching your budget. It might be hard to always find hotels in the $75 per night range, but it could be possible. If you do, they might be further from the things you want to see and add to the transportation expense. If you're planning on moving from country to country or long distances within a country, the transportation expenses could be somewhat more.

Here are some resources that can help you plan and check options and current prices for your trip:

- airfares & hotels, but since you seem to have airfarres taken care of, you may not need this one.

- particularly good for budget flights within Europe.

- trains are a convenient way to get around here. This site has a huge amount of information on using the trains. It includes detailed information on railpasses including how to tell whether a pass will be cheaper than individual tickets or not and links to the various national rail sites where you can find schedules and prices. There are also instructions on how to use a railpass if you go that way and what to avoid to get the most out of a pass.

- hotels/B&Bs - prices for the same hotel can vary hugely depending on the season and what local events are going on.

- hostels.

- monasteries & convents that offer accommodations

… - festivals, exhibitions and events

- information & advice

For sightseeing prices: check the websites for entrance fees for the museums & galleries you're interested in. I spend anywhere between nothing and 40 euro a day depending on exactly what I go to see when out exploring. For food, I spend around 25 to 50 euro for a meal, but you can eat for less. Here in Italy, you can get a whole pizza for 8 to 13 euro or a pasta dish in the same range. Panini or pizza by the slice is less. For reference, a McDonalds McMenu classico (medium) is going for around 7.50 euro. While you can eat cheaply most of the time, I would recommend getting a good local meal from time to time; that's part of the overall experience that it would be a shame to miss. When I travel, I like to try the local specialties and the good restaurants. Souvenirs can range anywhere from a few euro to hundreds or thousands - just set a budget and stick to it.

How much would a 2 month trip to Italy cost?

How much would a 2 month trip to Italy cost?

In maor tourist areas, you won't have any problem getting by in English, but not everyone will speak it. It's always a good idea to learn enough of the language for simple communication even if it's only to be polite. People will appreciate the effort.

Prices will depend on the kind of accommodations you use and what you see/do/eat as well as how much moving around you do. The exchange rate at the time you visit will also affect the prices in dollars. Right now, the exchange rate is better than it has been in some time. You can generally get by for around $100 per day or a little less (plus airfare) staying in cheap hostels and carefully watching your budget. Hotels would add to the expenses. Generally, I pay around 100 to 150 euro ($127 to $190 at the current exchange rates) per night for three to four star places, but there are cheaper options usually. For airfares from the US, count on around $1000 or more although you might be able to do a little better.

Here are some resources that can help you plan and check options and current prices for your trip:

- airfares & hotels; the explore function is useful for finding the less expensive places to fly into from your starting point.

- particularly good for budget flights within Europe, but you can also use everywhere as a destination to do something like the explore option on Kayak.

- a huge amount of information on train travel and railpasses. This includes how to determine if a railpass is worth the money for your trip, which railpass (if any) best suits your trip and how to use a pass if you have one. There are links to the national train websites where you can find schedules and prices for individual tickets.

- hotels/B&Bs - prices for the same hotel can vary hugely depending on the season and what local events are going on.

- hostels.

- monasteries & convents that offer accommodations

… - festivals, exhibitions and events

- information & advice

For sightseeing prices: check the websites for entrance fees for the museums & galleries you're interested in. I spend anywhere between nothing and 40 euro ($51) a day depending on exactly what I go to see when out exploring. For food, I spend around 25 to 50 euro ($32 to $63) for a meal, but you can eat for less. Here in Italy, you can get a whole pizza for 8 to 13 euro ($10 - $16) or a pasta dish in the same range. Panini or pizza by the slice is less. For reference, a McDonalds McMenu classico (medium) is going for around 7.50 euro ($9.50). Prices in other parts of Europe aren't all that different for meals. While you can eat cheaply most of the time, I would recommend getting a good local meal from time to time; that's part of the overall experience that it would be a shame to miss. When I travel, I like to try the local specialties and the good restaurants. Souvenirs can range anywhere from a few euro to hundreds or thousands - just set a budget and stick to it.

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