American Artists Appreciation Month on August, 2017: things you need to do to be a cultured person?

August, 2017 is American Artists Appreciation Month 2017. 10 Kid-Friendly Ways to Celebrate “American Artist Appreciation ... Artist Appreciation Month”

things you need to do to be a cultured person?

Know what it means to be cultured. A cultured person can be someone who is well-read in books, who has watched and engaged with classic films, has a refined appreciation for art, etc. To be cultured is also to be educated about the world and its languages, to understand world politics and be well-read in world history. Above all, a cultured person is one who is interested in culture and engages in culture.

Read more. A large part of culture comes from books, as they have existed for a longer time than most other media. The obvious thing to do would be to read classic books, but if you're a first-time-reader, this will be daunting and uninteresting.

Start backwards. Choose a genre that you have genuine interest in, such as fantasy or romantic fiction. Research the best books of that genre as judged by book enthusiasts, and read them. You may want to look up books in other genres which may catch your fancy while you're at it. If there is a genre you are not sure about, try it and you might actually enjoy it.

After you feel you've become reasonably well-read in your genre, expand your variety and also read some classic or recommended books. You will understand the books of the past more after reading books of present culture, and you'll find you enjoy them more, too.

Subscribe to a magazine which deals with a subject like literature, the arts, drama or music or a mixture thereof. Read articles from this magazine on a regular schedule. One a week, two a month, or whatever your schedule will allow. Follow leads presented by the articles you read. Every once in awhile one of the articles you read will inspire you to go further with a subject. If you read a great article about Mozart, take the article to a store where you can buy CDs and ask the counter attendant to direct you to some Mozart CDs that you might like. Buy a few or borrow some from the library, take them home and listen. If you read an article about an artist who sounds interesting, look online to find out which museums feature paintings by this artist. Then plan a visit! Maybe you will read about a play or a musical. Scan your newspaper and see if a local college or high school is showing this play soon and buy tickets.

Write. You can write poetry or short stories or even books and plays. Being cultured means to respond to culture, and the best way to do this is to create your own.

Watch films. It is very important to not only restrict yourself to books, but watch films regularly.

There are many films, and you may be unsure as to which watch.

Word-of-mouth is the best way to watch films of today's culture. You may remember your friends talking about a certain film. Go to the video store and scan the shelves to find names you may recognize.

Look up the reception of a film on Wikipedia before you watch it, just to make sure you're not wasting your time (if you're pressed for time). However, remember sometimes critics' opinions are not always right.

It is important to do your research. If you don't understand a certain film, then look it up on Wikipedia or somewhere on the internet. Sometimes the film will contain references to other older, classic films which you could not pick up on. This is a great segue to other recommended films! Watch these films next time, and you will soon be able to appreciate more films than you could previously.

Don't restrict yourself to English-language films. There are many other films out there worth watching, they are just in a different language.

Watch TV. While TV shows can be time-consuming to watch and finish, watching an episode of something a day is not so. There is much to be learned from TV shows. It is as significant a medium as any, and often provides social commentary.

Look up good TV shows that you think you might enjoy. There are many types, ranging from sitcoms to drama. Wikipedia usually has reception for more popular TV shows. You can look up ratings or just ask around.

Don't forget to be open-minded. TV shows you thought you might not like might turn out to be your favorite show. It has happened.

If you really like a TV show and you think you'd watch it again, then buy the DVDs.

Watch TV channels like Discovery and the History Channel. This is a painless way to get involved in topics such as the origins of impressionist art or the history of English kings.

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What is the history of the James Beard House?

What is the history of the James Beard House?

James Beard is recognized as the father of American gastronomy. Throughout his life, he pursued and advocated the highest standards, and served as a mentor to emerging talents in the field of the culinary arts.

Today the James Beard Foundation celebrates the country's culinary artists, provides scholarships and educational opportunities, serves as a resource for the industry, and offers members the opportunity to enjoy the delights of fine dining.

After Beard's death in 1985, Julia Child had the idea to preserve his home in New York City as the gathering place it was throughout his life. The late Peter Kump, a former student of Beard's and the founder of the Institute of Culinary Education (formerly Peter Kump's New York Cooking School), spearheaded the effort to purchase the house and create the Foundation. But while the Beard House is our center, the Foundation has a decidedly national agenda.

Each month, members from across the country look forward to receiving our Calendar, offering news in the field of gastronomy and our upcoming events. Our quarterly magazine, Beard House, is a comprehensive and entertaining compendium of the best in food journalism. All members receive the James Beard Foundation Restaurant Directory giude to, a directory of all chefs who have either presented a meal at the Beard House or have participated in one of our out-of-House fundraising events. In addition, our Professional members are included in our Directory of Fine Food and Beverage Professionals, an invaluable resource for anyone in the field.

Beard's renovated brownstone is at 167 West 12th Street, in the heart of Greenwich Village. It is North America's only historical culinary center, a place where Foundation members, the press, and the general public can savor the creations of both established and emerging chefs from across the country and around the globe.

Nearly every night of the week, culinary talents such as Jody Adams, Daniel Boulud, Gail Gand, Suzanne Goin, Emeril Lagasse, Nobu Matsuhisa, Mark Peel and Nancy Silverton, Caprial Pence, Jacques Pépin, Douglas Rodriguez, Anne Rosenzweig, Susan Spicer, and Charlie Trotter, work their magic in Beard's kitchen. These dinners not only offer an opportunity to enjoy splendid meals, but a chance to discuss food with great chefs, wine professionals, journalists, cookbook authors, and other members.

Fundamental to our efforts is the promotion of fine food and drink as the soul-satisfying and artistic profession it can be. That's why we showcase the finest talents, provide scholarships to culinary students produce a broad range of publications, and foster the appreciation of the remarkable talents of food and wine professionals.

While Beard was alive, he was the preeminent resource for all things gastronomic. Today, the Foundation and the House assume that role. At the House, both the library and its archives are open to members, food writers, and students. Meeting rooms are available to not-for-profit culinary organizations.

True to Beard's spirit of helping new talent, the Foundation offers and administers an extensive program of scholarships, volunteer opportunities, and workshops—all part of our ongoing commitment to further elevate American gastronomy. The Foundation, in cooperation with other national food and culinary organizations, also works around the country to educate children about nutrition awareness and food appreciation and to introduce them to the world of fine dining.

Often called "the Oscars of the food world," the annual James Beard Foundation Awards is the industry's biggest party, and part of a fortnight of activities that celebrate fine cuisine and Beard's birthday. The Awards ceremony, held on the first Monday in May, honors the finest chefs, restaurants, journalists, cookbook authors, restaurant designers, and electronic media professionals in the country. It culminates in a reception featuring a tasting of the signature dishes of more than 30 of our very best chefs.

Since 1986, The James Beard Foundation has been in the forefront of America's culinary revolution

What is the James Beard House?

What is the James Beard House?

James Beard is recognized as the father of American gastronomy. Throughout his life, he pursued and advocated the highest standards, and served as a mentor to emerging talents in the field of the culinary arts.

Today the James Beard Foundation celebrates the country's culinary artists, provides scholarships and educational opportunities, serves as a resource for the industry, and offers members the opportunity to enjoy the delights of fine dining.

After Beard's death in 1985, Julia Child had the idea to preserve his home in New York City as the gathering place it was throughout his life. The late Peter Kump, a former student of Beard's and the founder of the Institute of Culinary Education (formerly Peter Kump's New York Cooking School), spearheaded the effort to purchase the house and create the Foundation. But while the Beard House is our center, the Foundation has a decidedly national agenda.

Each month, members from across the country look forward to receiving our Calendar, offering news in the field of gastronomy and our upcoming events. Our quarterly magazine, Beard House, is a comprehensive and entertaining compendium of the best in food journalism. All members receive the James Beard Foundation Restaurant Directory giude to, a directory of all chefs who have either presented a meal at the Beard House or have participated in one of our out-of-House fundraising events. In addition, our Professional members are included in our Directory of Fine Food and Beverage Professionals, an invaluable resource for anyone in the field.

Beard's renovated brownstone is at 167 West 12th Street, in the heart of Greenwich Village. It is North America's only historical culinary center, a place where Foundation members, the press, and the general public can savor the creations of both established and emerging chefs from across the country and around the globe.

Nearly every night of the week, culinary talents such as Jody Adams, Daniel Boulud, Gail Gand, Suzanne Goin, Emeril Lagasse, Nobu Matsuhisa, Mark Peel and Nancy Silverton, Caprial Pence, Jacques Pépin, Douglas Rodriguez, Anne Rosenzweig, Susan Spicer, and Charlie Trotter, work their magic in Beard's kitchen. These dinners not only offer an opportunity to enjoy splendid meals, but a chance to discuss food with great chefs, wine professionals, journalists, cookbook authors, and other members.

Fundamental to our efforts is the promotion of fine food and drink as the soul-satisfying and artistic profession it can be. That's why we showcase the finest talents, provide scholarships to culinary students produce a broad range of publications, and foster the appreciation of the remarkable talents of food and wine professionals.

While Beard was alive, he was the preeminent resource for all things gastronomic. Today, the Foundation and the House assume that role. At the House, both the library and its archives are open to members, food writers, and students. Meeting rooms are available to not-for-profit culinary organizations.

True to Beard's spirit of helping new talent, the Foundation offers and administers an extensive program of scholarships, volunteer opportunities, and workshops—all part of our ongoing commitment to further elevate American gastronomy. The Foundation, in cooperation with other national food and culinary organizations, also works around the country to educate children about nutrition awareness and food appreciation and to introduce them to the world of fine dining.

Often called "the Oscars of the food world," the annual James Beard Foundation Awards is the industry's biggest party, and part of a fortnight of activities that celebrate fine cuisine and Beard's birthday. The Awards ceremony, held on the first Monday in May, honors the finest chefs, restaurants, journalists, cookbook authors, restaurant designers, and electronic media professionals in the country. It culminates in a reception featuring a tasting of the signature dishes of more than 30 of our very best chefs.

Since 1986, The James Beard Foundation has been in the forefront of America's culinary revolution

Also on this date Tuesday, August 1, 2017...