National Hobo Week on August, 2017: I'm a 14 year old girl in living in brooklyn and I need to raise at least $1000 dollars in 6 weeks

National Hobo Week 2017. Blog Archive » 2008 National Hobo Convention ... 2008 National Hobo Convention

I’m a 14 year old girl in living in brooklyn and I need to raise at least $1000 dollars in 6 weeks

um I'm telling you not to do this, DO NOT DO THIS, but if you realistically want that much money you should lie, steal, whore, rob, sell coke, or get some cash via some good old fashion GTA (grand theft auto).

Now if you want to do this legally (the boring way haha, but here I'm serious) then get a loan. You could get a job and pay it back latter, or if you find a family friend or someone who will give you the money and you could pay back in say a year then it will work out. Maybe you could start a fund raiser and go to random places and put those little coin collectors everywhere, maybe you'll be able to make enough, surveys will take too long, and jobs won't give you that much unless you do something dangerous or rare or crazy.

Oh yeah bumming would work. I have heard the bums make more then 200$ a day. As a little girl asking for money you should make that much or more. Of course this is one of the most degrading, scary, and dangerous jobs because you might get assaulted or worse if you do not have a chaperone, but if they are right near you then it might make you look bad unless you maybe work together with another hobo who is a poor looking sad woman with some experience and make a sign that says "I am starving but please feed my daughter" or something like that for her or for yourself "I am a young girl and I need food, please help me out with whatever you can. <3" This way will make you enough but its not very moral, although a sacrifice might be the price for this trip. What is so great about this trip? You're so young, will you really benefit from this? Really consider this because it might just be a scam, those things sometimes are, so be careful.

Good luck! :D

Famous historical people for a biography paper?

Famous historical people for a biography paper?

FAMOUS HISTORICAL ACTOR, BURL IVES

Burl Icle Ivanhoe Ives (14 June 1909 – 14 April 1995) was an Academy Award winning American actor and acclaimed folk music singer and author. He won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for his role in the movie The Big Country; however, he is probably better remembered for his music. The prominent music critic John Rockwell has been quoted in the New York Times as saying that "Ives's voice... had the sheen and finesse of opera without its latter-day Puccinian vulgarities and without the pretensions of operatic ritual. It was genteel in expressive impact without being genteel in social conformity. And it moved people."[1]

Contents

Birth name Burle Icle Ivanhoe Ives

Born June 14, 1909(1909-06-14)

Hunt, Illinois

Died April 14, 1995 (aged 85)

Anacortes, Washington

Years active 1935 - 1993

Spouse(s) Helen Peck Ehrich (1945-1971)

Dorothy Koster Paul (1971-1995)

Life and career

[edit] Early life

Burl Ives was one of six children born to a Scottish-Irish farming family in Jasper County, Illinois in 1909. Born near Hunt City in Jasper County, Illinois, Ives was the son of Levi "Frank" Ives (1880-1947) and Cordelia "Dellie" White (1882-1954). He had six siblings: Audry, Artie, Clarence, Argola, Lillburn, and Norma. His father was at first a farmer and then a contractor who did work for the county and others. One day Ives was singing in the garden with his mother, and his uncle overheard them. He invited his nephew to sing at the old soldiers' reunion in Hunt City. The boy performed a rendition of the folk ballad "Barbara Allen" and impressed both his uncle and the audience.[2]

From 1927 to 1929 Ives attended Eastern Illinois State Teachers College in Charleston (now Eastern Illinois University), where he played football.[3] During his junior year, he was sitting in English class, listening to a lecture on Beowulf, when he suddenly realized that he was wasting his time. So he got up to leave. As he walked out the door the professor made a snide remark and Ives slammed the door behind him.[4] Sixty years later, the school named a building after its most famous dropout.[5]

On July 23, 1929, in Richmond, Indiana, Ives did a trial recording of "Behind the Clouds" for the Starr Piano Company's Gennett label, but the recording was rejected and destroyed a few weeks later.[6]

[edit] 1930s-1940s

Ives traveled about the U.S. as an itinerant singer during the early 1930s, earning his way by doing odd jobs and playing his banjo. He was jailed in Mona, Utah, for vagrancy and for singing “Foggy Foggy Dew,” which the authorities decided was a bawdy song.[7] In c. 1931 he landed on WBOW radio in Terre Haute, Indiana. He also went back to school, registering for classes at Indiana State Teachers College (now Indiana State University).[8]

In 1940 Ives began his own radio show, titled The Wayfaring Stranger after one of his ballads. The show was very popular. In the 1940s he popularized several traditional folk songs, such as “Lavender Blue” (his first hit, a folk song from the 17th century), “Foggy Foggy Dew” (an English/Irish folk song), “Blue Tail Fly” (an old Civil War tune) and “Big Rock Candy Mountain” (an old hobo ditty).

In early 1942 Ives was drafted by the military and spent time first at Camp Dix, then at Camp Upton, where he joined the cast of Irving Berlin's This Is the Army. When the show went to Hollywood, he was transferred to the Army Air Force. He was discharged honorably, apparently for medical reasons, in September 1943. Between September and December 1943, Ives lived in California with actor Harry Morgan, who played Colonel Sherman T. Potter on M*A*S*H many years later. In December 1943, Ives returned to New York City and went to work again for CBS radio for $100 a week.[9]

On Dec. 6, 1945, Ives married 29-year-old script writer Helen Peck Ehrlich.[10] The next year, Ives was cast as a singing cowboy in the film Smoky. Other movie credits include East of Eden (1955); Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958); The Big Country (1958), for which he won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor; and Our Man in Havana (1959), based on the Graham Greene novel; and many others. His autobiography, The Wayfaring Stranger, was published in 1948. He also wrote or compiled several other books, including Burl Ives Song Book (1953); Tales of America (1954); Sea Songs of Sailing, Whaling, and Fishing (1956); and The Wayfaring Stranger's Notebook (1962).

[edit] Broadway roles

Ives' Broadway career included appearances in The Boys From Syracuse (1938-39), Heavenly Express (1940), This Is the Army (1942), Sing Out Sweet Land (1944), Paint Your Wagon (1951-52), and Dr. Cook's Garden (1967); his most notable Broadway performance was as Big Daddy in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955-56), a role written specifically for Ives by Tennessee Williams.[citation needed]

[edit] 1950s: Communist "blacklisting"

Ives was identified in the infamous 1950 pamphlet Red Channels as an entertainer with supposed Communist ties.[11] In 1952, he cooperated with the House Unamerican Activities Committee and named fellow folk singer Pete Seeger and others as possible Communists.[12]

His cooperation with the HUAC ended his blacklisting, allowing him to continue with his movie acting. Forty-one years later, Ives and Seeger were reunited in a benefit concert in New York City; they sang "Blue Tail Fly" together.[13]

[edit] 1960s-1990s

In the 1960s Ives began singing country music with greater frequency. In 1962 he released three songs which became country music hits, “A Little Bitty Tear,” “Call Me Mr In-Between,” and “Funny Way of Laughing.” All three songs also topped the pop charts. In the 1960s and 1970s, Ives had a number of television roles. He played the narrator, Sam the Snowman, in the Rankin-Bass animated television special, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer (1964). He performed in other television productions, most notably Pinocchio (1968) and Roots (1977). He starred in two television series: O. K. Crackerby! (1965-1966) and The Bold Ones: The Lawyers (1969-1972).

Ives and Helen Peck Ehrlich were divorced in 1971.[14] Ives then married Dorothy Koster Paul in London in that same year.[15] In his later years, Ives and his wife, Dorothy, lived with their children in a home located alongside the water in Anacortes, in the Puget Sound area of Washington. He also had a home just south of Hope Town on Elbow Cay, a barrier island of the Abacos in the Bahamas.[citation needed]

Ives lent his name and image to the U.S. Bureau of Land Management's "This Land is Your Land, Keep It Clean" campaign in the 1970's. He was portrayed with the program's fictional spokesman, Johnny Horizon.

In 1995 Ives died of cancer of the mouth at the age of 85, and he is interred in Mound Cemetery in Jasper County, Illinois.[16]

[edit] Popular culture references

Ives's "A Holly Jolly Christmas” remains a popular tune during the Christmas season; it was featured in the Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer special. Frank Black of the Pixies is a contemporary fan of Ives according to Apple's iTunes Music Store. In a contribution to “Celebrity Playlists”, Black includes no fewer than 15 of Ives' hits in his playlist. Madison, Wisconsin, punk rock band Killdozer released the EP Burl in 1986, which they dedicated “in loving memory of” Ives, who was still alive (and evidently still remembered) at the time.

The Ren and Stimpy Show's first season episode "Stimpy's Invention” featured a record, “Happy Happy Joy Joy,” which parodied Ives' singing style and recreated some of his crusty dialogue from The Big Country. When Ives saw the episode, he contacted Ren and Stimpy Show creator John Kricfalusi and said that he would have been willing to do the voice-over work for it.[citation needed] Ives is known to Star Wars fans for his role as the narrator in the 1984 made-for-TV film Caravan of Courage: An Ewok Adventure.

[edit] Discography

[edit] Albums

* Okeh Presents the Wayfaring Stranger (1941, Okeh K-3, 4 records, 10 inch, 78 rpm)

* The Wayfaring Stranger (1944, Asch 345, 3 records, 10 inch, 78 rpm)

* BBC Presents The Martins and the Coys (1944, BBC World, 6 records, 12 inch, 78 rpm)

* Lonesome Train: A Musical Legend (1944, Decca DA 375, 3 records, 12 inch, 78 rpm)

* A Collection of Ballads and Folk Songs (1945, Decca A-407, 4 records, 10 inch, 78 rpm)

* Sing Out, Sweet Land (1946, Decca A-404, 6 records, 10 inch, 78 rpm)

* Ballads and Folk Songs, Volume II (1947, Decca A-431, 4 records, 10 inch, 78 rpm)

* Animal Fair: Songs for Children (1948, Columbia MJV 59, 2 records, 10 inch, 78 rpm)

* A Collection of Ballads, Folk and Country Songs (c. 1949, Decca A-711, 3 records, 10 inch, 78 rpm)

* The Return of the Wayfaring Stranger (1949, Columbia C-186, 4 records, 10 inch, 78 rpm)

* Mother Goose Songs (1950, Columbia MJV 61, 10 inch, 78 rpm)

* Burl Ives Sings the Lollipop Tree, The Little Turtle, and The Moon Is the North Wind's Cookie (c. 1950, Columbia MJV 110, 10 inch, 78 rpm)

* More Folksongs by Burl Ives (1950, Columbia C-213, 4 records, 10 inch, 78 rpm)

* Hymns Sung by Burl Ives (1950, Columbia C-203, 4 records, 10 inch, 78 rpm)

* Historical America in Song (1950, Encyclopædia Britannica Films, 6 albums in 30 records, 12 inch, 78 rpm)

* Christmas Day in the Morning (1952, Decca DL 5428, 10 inch, 33 1/3 rpm)

* Women: Folksongs about the Fair Sex (1953, Decca DL 5490, 10 inch, 33 1/3 rpm)

* Folk Songs Dramatic and Humorous (1953, Decca DL 5467, 10 inch, 33 1/3 rpm)

* Coronation Concert (1954, Decca DL 8080, 12 inch, 33 1/3 rpm)

* The Wild Side of Life (1955, Decca DL 8107, 12 inch, 33 1/3 rpm)

* Men: Songs for and about Men (1955, Decca DL 8125, 12 inch, 33 1/3 rpm)

* Down to the Sea in Ships (1956, Decca DL 8245, 12 inch, 33 1/3 rpm)

* Burl Ives Sings In the Quiet of the Night (1956, Decca DL 8247)

* Burl Ives Sings for Fun (1956, Decca DL 8248)

* Burl Ives Sings Songs for All Ages (1957, Columbia CL 980)

* Christmas Eve with Burl Ives (1957, Decca DL 8391)

* Songs of Ireland (1957, Decca DL 8444)

* Captain Burl Ives' Ark (1957, Decca DL 8587)

* Old Time Varieties (1958, Decca DL 8637)

* Australian Folk Songs (1958, Decca DL 8749)

* Cheers (1959, Decca DL 8886)

* Little White Duck and Other Songs (1960, Harmony HL 9507)

* Burl Ives and the Korean Orphan Choir Sing of Faith and Joy (1960s, Word W 3259)

* Burl Ives Sings Irving Berlin (c. 1960, United Artists UAL 3117)

* Manhattan Troubadour (1961, United Artists Records UAS 6145)

* The Versatile Burl Ives! (c. 1961, Decca DL 4152)

* Songs of the West (1961, Decca DL 4179)

* It's Just My Funny Way of Laughin' (1962, Decca DL 4279)

* Country Style (1962, Decca DL 4361)

* Burl Ives and the Folk Singers Three (1962, Design SDLP 156)

* Songs I Sang in Sunday School (1962, Word W 3229)

* Sunshine in My Soul (1962, Decca DL 4320)

* The Lollipop Tree (1963, Harmony HL 9551)

* Singin' Easy (1963, Decca DL 4433)

* The Best of Burl's for Boys and Girls (1963, Decca DL 4390)

* Walt Disney Presents Summer Magic (1963, Buena Vista BV 4025)

* Burl Ives Presents America's Musical Heritage (1963, Longines Symphonette Society LW 194-LW 199, 6 records)

* Walt Disney Presents Burl Ives' Animal Folk (1963, Disneyland ST 3920)

* Walt Disney Presents Burl Ives' Folk Lullabies (1964, Disneyland ST 3924)

* Scouting Along with Burl Ives (1964, Columbia CSP 347)

* True Love (1964, Decca DL 4533)

* Burl Ives Sings Pearly Shells and Other Favorites (1964, Decca DL 4578)

* Chim Chim Cheree and Other Children's Choices (1964, Disneyland ST 3927)

* Have a Holly Jolly Christmas (1965, Decca DL 4689)

* On the Beach at Waikiki (1965, Decca DL 4668)

* Shall We Gather at the River? (1965, Word W 3339)

* I Do Believe (1966, Word W 3391)

* My Gal Sal and Other Favorites (1966, Decca DL 4606)

* Burl's Choice (1966, Decca DL 4734)

* Something Special (1966, Decca DL 4789)

* Burl's Broadway (1967, Decca DL 4876)

* Burl Ives Favorites (1967, United Artists S 21006)

* Burl Ives Sings (1967, Coronet CXS 271)

* Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer (1967, Decca DL 74815)

* Sweet, Sad and Salty (1968, Decca DL 75028)

* The Big Country Hits (1968, Decca DL 74972)

* The Times They Are A-Changin' (1968, Columbia CS 9675)

* How Great Thou Art (1969, Word WST 8537)

* Got the World by the Tail (c. 1969, Harmony HS 11275)

* Christmas at the White House (1972, Caedmon TC 1415)

* Song Book (1973, MCA Coral CB 20029)

* Payin' My Dues Again (1973, MCA Records MCA 318)

* Burl Ives Sings Little White Duck and Other Children's Favorites (1974, CBS Records C33183, previously released on HS 14507)

* Christmas by the Bay (1977)

[edit] Singles (Selected)

* Grandfather Kringle / Twelve Days of Christmas (1951, 10 in., 78 rpm, Columbia MJV-124)

* That's My Heart Strings / The Bus Stop Song (c. 1956, 7 in., 45 rpm, Decca 30046)

* I'm the Boss / The Moon Is High (c. 1963, 7 in., 45 rpm, Decca 31504)

* Salt Water Guitar / The Story of Bobby Lee Trent (1964, 7 in., 45 rpm, Decca 31811)

* Evil Off My Mind / Taste of Heaven (c. 1967, 7 in., 45 rpm, Decca 31997)

* Gingerbread House / Tumbleweed Snowman (c. 1970?, 7 in. 45 rpm, Big Tree BT-130)

* The Tail of the Comet Kohoutek / A Very Fine Lady (1974, 7 in., 45 rpm, MCA 40175)

* It's Gonna Be a Mixed Up Xmas / The Christmas Legend of Monkey Joe (1978, 7 in., 45 & 33 1/3 rpm, Monkey Joe MJ1)

* The Night before Christmas / Instrumental (1986, 7 in., 45 rpm, Stillman/Teague STP-1013)

[edit] Radio Work (selected)[17]

* The Wayfarin' Stranger, CBS & WOR (1940s)

* Back Where I Came From, CBS (Sept. 30, 1940-Feb. 28, 1941)

* Burl Ives Coffee Club, CBS (July 5, 1941-Jan. 24, 1942)

* The Columbia Workshop, CBS

o "Roadside" (Mar. 2, 1941)

o "The Log of the R-77," second installment of Twenty-Six by Corwin (May 11, 1941)

o "The People, Yes," third installment of Twenty-Six by Corwin (May 18, 1941)

o "A Child's History of Hot Music" (Mar. 15, 1942)

* Columbia Presents Corwin, CBS

o "The Lonesome Train" (Mar. 21, 1944)

o "El Capitan and the Corporal" (July 25, 1944)

* The Theatre Guild on the Air, ABC

o "Sing Out, Sweet Land" (Oct. 21, 1945)

* Hollywood Star Time, CBS

o "The Return of Frank James" (Mar. 10, 1946)

* The Burl Ives Show, Syndication (1946-1948)

* Hollywood Fights Back, ABC (Nov. 2, 1947)

* The Kaiser Traveler, ABC (July 24-Sept. 4, 1949)

* Burl Ives Sings, Syndication (1950s)

[edit] Theater Appearances (selected)[18]

* Pocohontas Preferred (1935-1936)[19]

* The Boys from Syracuse (Nov. 23, 1938 - June 10, 1939)

* Heavenly Express (April 18-May 4, 1940)

* This Is the Army (July 4-Sept. 26, 1942)

* Sing Out Sweet Land (Dec. 27, 1944 - Mar. 24, 1945)

* She Stoops to Conquer (1950)[20]

* Knickerbocker Holiday (1950)[21]

* The Man Who Came to Dinner (1951)[22]

* Paint Your Wagon (Nov. 12, 1951 - July 19, 1952)

* Show Boat (1954)[23]

* Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (Mar 24, 1955 - Nov 17, 1956)

* Dr. Cook's Garden (Sept. 25-30, 1967)

[edit] Filmography (selected)

[edit] Television

* Playhouse 90: The Miracle Worker (1957)

* Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer (1964)

* O.K. Crackerby! (1965-1966)

* Pinocchio (1968)

* The Bold Ones: The Lawyers (1969-1972)

* Roots (1977)

* Little House on the Prairie: The Hunters (1977)

* The New Adventures of Heidi (1978)

* Caravan of Courage: An Ewok Adventure (1984)

[edit] Films

* Smoky (1946)

* Station West (1948)

* So Dear to My Heart (1948)

* Sierra (1950)

* East of Eden (1955)

* Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958)

* Desire Under the Elms (1958)

* The Big Country (1958)

* Day of the Outlaw (1959)

* Our Man in Havana (1959)

* Let No Man Write My Epitaph (1960)

* The Spiral Road (1962)

* Summer Magic (1963)

* The Brass Bottle (1964)

* Ensign Pulver (1964)

* Rocket to the Moon (1968)

* The McMasters (1970)

* Baker's Hawk (1976)

* Just You and Me, Kid (1979)

* Earthbound (1981)

* White Dog (1982)

* Ewoks: Caravan Of Courage (1984)

* Two Moon Junction (1988)

[edit] Concerts (selected)

* Royal Winsor, New York City, April 28, 1939[24]

* Town Hall, New York City, Dec. 1, 1945[25]

* Opera House, San Francisco, Feb. 9, 1949[26]

* Columbia University, New York City, Oct. 19, 1950[27]

* Royal Festival Hall, London, May 10, 1952[28]

* Albert Hall, London, Oct. 20, 1976[29]

* Chautauqua, New York, 1982 (VHS)

* Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, Illinois, April 27, 1990[30]

* Brodniak Hall, Anacortes, Washington, 1991 (VHS)

* Mt. Vernon, Washington, February 1993 (VHS)

* Folksong U.S.A., 92nd Street Y, New York City, May 17, 1993[31]

[edit] Bibliography

* The Wayfarin' Stranger: A Collection of 21 Folk Songs and Ballads with Guitar and Piano Accompaniment. New York: Leeds Music, 1945.

* Wayfaring Stranger. New York: Whittlesey House, 1948 (autobiography)

* Favorite Folk Ballads of Burl Ives: A Collection of 17 Folk Songs and Ballads with Guitar and Piano Accompaniment. New York: Leeds Music, 1949

* Burl Ives Song Book. New York: Ballantine Books, 1953

* Sailing on a Very Fine Day. Chicago: Rand McNally, 1954

* Burl Ives Folio of Australian Songs, collected and arranged by Percy Jones, 1954.

* Song in America: Our Musical Heritage, co-authored with Albert Hague. New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, n.d.

* Tales of America. Cleveland: World Publishing, 1954

* "Introduction" to Paul Kapp's A Cat Came Fiddling and Other Rhymes of Childhood, New York: Harcourt Brace, 1956.

* The Ghost and Hans Van Duin [excerpt from Tales of America]. Pittsburgh: Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1956

* Sea Songs of Sailing, Whaling, and Fishing. New York: Ballantine Books, 1956

* The Wayfaring Stranger's Notebook. Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill, 1962

* Irish Songs. New York: Duell, Sloan & Pearce, n.d.

* The Burl Ives Sing-Along Song Book: A Treasury of American Folk Songs & Ballads, 1963

* Albad the Oaf. London: Abelard-Schuman, 1965.

* More Burl Ives Songs. New York: Ballantine Books, 1966

* Sing a Fun Song. New York: Southern Music Publishing, 1968

* Burl Ives: Four Folk Song and Four Stories, co-authored with Barbara Hazen. N.p.: CBS Records, 1969

* Spoken Arts Treasury of American Ballads and Folk Songs, co-authored with Arthur Klein and Helen Ives, n.d.

* Easy Guitar Method. Dayton, Ohio : Heritage Music Press, 1975

* We Americans: A Musical Journey with Burl Ives. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society, 1978 (pamphlet)

* "Foreword" to Martin Scot Kosins's Maya's First Rose. West Bloomfield, MI: Altweger and Mandel Publishing, 1991

[edit] References

1. ^ John Rockwell, quoted in book review of Outsider, John Rockwell on the Arts, 1967-2006, by John Rockwell, the New York Times Book Review, 24 December 2006, page 13

2. ^ Burl Ives, Wayfaring Stranger, New York: Whittlesey House, 1948, pp. 15-20.

3. ^ Betsy Cole, "Eastern Mourns Burl Ives," Daily Eastern News, April 17, 1995.

4. ^ Burl Ives, Wayfaring Stranger, New York: Whittlesey House, 1948, pp. 108-109

5. ^ Associated Press, "Eastern Illinois University Honors Famed Dropout Burl Ives," St. Louis Post Dispatch, May 3, 1990, p., 71. Accessed via NewsBank.

6. ^ Tony Russell, Country Music Records: A Discography, 1921-1942, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004, pp 17, 369

7. ^ Burl Ives, Wayfaring Stranger, New York: Whittlesey House, 1948, pp. 129-132.

8. ^ Burl Ives, Wayfaring Stranger, New York: Whittlesey House, 1948, p. 145.

9. ^ "Testimony of Burl Icle Ives, New York, N.Y. [on May 20, 1952]," Hearings before the Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and Other Internal Security Laws of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, Eighty-Second Congress, Second Session on Subversive Infiltration of Radio, Television, and the Entertainment Industry. Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1952. Part 2, p. 206.

10. ^ "Burl Ives Weds Script Writer," New York Times, Dec. 8, 1945, p. 24. Accessed via ProQuest Historical Newspapers.

11. ^ Michael D. Murray, Encyclopedia of Television News, Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1998. p 18. Accessed via Ebrary.

12. ^ "Testimony of Burl Icle Ives, New York, N.Y. [on May 20, 1952]," Hearings before the Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and Other Internal Security Laws of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, Eighty-Second Congress, Second Session on Subversive Infiltration of Radio, Television, and the Entertainment Industry. 2 parts. Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1952. Part 2, pp. 205-228.

13. ^ Dean Kahn, "Ives-Seeger Rift Finally Ended with 'Blue-Tail Fly' Harmony: Skagitonians Ives, Murros Were on Opposite Sides," Knight Ridder Tribune Business News [from Bellingham Herald, Washington], Mar 19, 2006, p. 1. Accessed via ProQuest ABI/Inform.

14. ^ "Burl Ives Divorced," New York Times, Feb. 19, 1971, p. 27. Accessed via ProQuest Historical Newspapers.

15. ^ UPI, "Burl Ives Weds," Evening Sentinel, Holland, Michigan, April 17, 1971, p. 3. Accessed via Access NewspaperARCHIVE.

16. ^ Richard Severo, "Burl Ives, the Folk Singer Whose Imposing Acting Won an Oscar, Dies at 85," New York Times, April 15, 1995, p. 10. Accessed via ProQuest Historical Newspapers.

17. ^ Vincent Terrace, Radio's Golden Years: The Encyclopedia of Radio Programs, 1930-1960, San Diego: Barnes and Company, 1981, pp. 43, 147; John Dunning, On the Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio, New York: Oxford University Press, p. 123; Dave Goldin, RadioGOLDINdex: link. Unless otherwise noted, the information in this section comes from these sources.

18. ^ Internet Broadway Database: Burl Ives Credits on Broadway: link. Unless otherwise noted, this database is the source of the information in this section.

19. ^ Guide to the Burl Ives Papers, 1913-1975, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts: link

20. ^ "Old Play in Manhattan," Time, Jan. 09, 1950, link

21. ^ "Along the Straw Hat," New York Times, July 30, 1950, p. X3. Includes photo of Ives. Accessed via ProQuest Historical Newspapers.

22. ^ "Along the Straw Hat Trail," New York Times, Sept. 2, 1951, p. 54. Includes photo of Ives. Accessed via ProQuest Historical Newspapers.

23. ^ L.F., "The Theatre: 'Show Boat,' New York Times, May 6, 1954, p. 44. Includes photograph of Ives and co-stars. Accessed via ProQuest Historical Newspapers.

24. ^ John Martin, "The Dance: Folk Fetes," New York Times, April 23, 1939, p. 128. Accessed via ProQuest Historical Newspapers.

25. ^ Guide to the Burl Ives Papers, 1913-1975, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts: link

26. ^ "Burl Ives to Be in S. F. February 9," San Mateo Times, San Mateo, CA, Jan. 29, 1949, p. 5. Accessed via Access NewspaperARCHIVE.

27. ^ Display ad, New York Times, Oct. 8, 1950, p. X3. Accessed via ProQuest Historical Newspapers.

28. ^ "Burl Ives Packs London Hall," New York Times, May 11, 1952, p. 95. Accessed via ProQuest Historical Newspapers.

29. ^ UPI, "Ives Returns [to London]," Syracuse Herald Journal, Syracuse, NY, Oct. 1, 1976, p. 33. Accessed via Access NewspaperARCHIVE.

30. ^ Associated Press, "Eastern Illinois University Honors Famed Dropout Burl Ives," St. Louis Post-Dispatch, May 3, 1990, p. 71. Accessed via NewsBank.

31. ^ Stephen Holden, "The Cream of Folk, Reunited for a Cause," New York Times, May 19, 1993, p. C15. Includes photo of Ives, Seeger, and others. Accessed via ProQuest Historical Newspapers.

[edit] External links

* Burl Ives at the Internet Movie Database

* Official website for Burl Ives

* Burl Ives Grave Site

* Guide to the Burl Ives Papers, 1913-1975 at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts

* Burl Ives Collection at the Library of Congress

* Burl Ives Performance Review

* Burl Ives - Discography

* Article in Scottish Rite Journal

* Burl Ives on Wookieepedia, a Star Wars wiki

Awards

Preceded by

Red Buttons

for Sayonara Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor

1958

for The Big Country Succeeded by

Hugh Griffith

for Ben-Hur

taking care of a dog with no money?

taking care of a dog with no money?

You won't be able to bring her into most areas of the park so I don't see the point of taking her.

"Pets are prohibited in the backcountry and on trails and boardwalks"

Also on this date Tuesday, August 1, 2017...