US Air Force Day 2020 is on Saturday, August 1, 2020: My Boy friend is a US AIR FORCE he will have a vacation this coming NOvember for 20 days

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Saturday, August 1, 2020 is US Air Force Day 2020. Highway to the Danger Zone Credit: U.S. Air Force photo

My Boy friend is a US AIR FORCE he will have a vacation this coming NOvember for 20 days..

You need to contact the Air Force and the family court over there in the Philippines. Random folks on the net may not give you reliable information. Best wishes!

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I have questions about the US Air Force.?

I have questions about the US Air Force.?

I don't mean to sound arrogant, but it sounds as if you don't know a whole lot about the military or how it functions, so if that's the case then I kindly suggest you do some basic research into the military as a whole. Like I said, I don't want to come off as arrogant, I just think that it would behoove you to do some general research.

With that said, to be a pilot in any service, you have to be an officer. To be an officer, you must: 1) have a bachelors degree and 2) have successfully completed an officer accession program. There are actually quite a few different officer accession programs, but the common three are the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC), the Federal Service Academies, and Officer Candidate School (OCS).

The ROTC program is merely something that you participate in while in college. The way it works is that you take a set of classes offered by the ROTC program at a university in conjunction with your regular degree program. This curriculum is designed to teach you the basics of the military, and prepare you to become an officer. The first two years of ROTC is designed to introduce you to the military and to help you decide whether or not you want to become an officer. The last two years of the ROTC program prepares you to actually become an officer and go on active duty. Between your sophomore and junior years in the program, you complete a summer camp training session. To sign a contract with the military, you must successfully complete the summer training. The contract obligates you to military service as an officer after you graduate. Therefore, as you can see, the first two years of ROTC are optional, and the last two are mandatory if you intend on becoming an officer. All services with the exception of the Marine Corps and the Coast Guard have an ROTC program (the Marines get their officers from Navy ROTC).

The service academies are a different path. To be appointed to one of the service academies, you must apply to each academy itself, AND apply for a nomination to said academy from either a senator/congressman or the President of Vice President. If you successfully receive a nomination, then you go to the selection pool for each respective academy. Then, if they select you, you will then be admitted to the school. However, you are 23 and therefore you exceed the age limit for the academies. All services with the exception of the Marine Corps have academies (again the Marine's get their officers from the Naval Academy).

Finally, there is OCS. OCS is usually a 10-12 week program, depending on the service. OCS is designed for those who have already graduated college, but did not participate in ROTC. Simply put, you apply for OCS after you receive your bachelors degree. If you are accepted, then you attend the 90 day training program and you subsequently receive a commission as an officer.

On that note, you don't "enlist" to become a pilot. You must have a degree AND complete one of these officer training programs. To become an officer, you receive a "commission". The enlisted and officer echelons are two different worlds.

Now, lets talk about becoming a pilot. As I said before, to become a pilot in the military you MUST be an officer. If you want to become a pilot, you apply for flight school either during one of these officer training programs or after you have graduated. You must meet strict academic, physical, and medical requirements. Assuming you are accepted, then you attend flight training (there are several phases of it) and successfully graduate from it. Then you receive your orders for your first operational duty assignment as a pilot.

If you want to fly jets, then the Air Force or the Navy is the way to go. If you want to fly helos, then the Army is your best bet. The Air Force does not care what your degree is in to fly. All they want to see is that you have a degree. Same goes for the Army. The Navy does like to see technical degrees (i.e. engineering, physics, etc.), but it is not necessarily a requirement to fly. I wouldn't say there is currently any branch that you will have a "best chance to become a pilot", a lot of it depends on your timing and qualifications. Sometimes there is a huge need for pilots, and sometimes there is almost no need. It all depends. However I will say this: the Air Force is oriented around it's main goal which is flying, the Army is oriented around its main goal which is fighting on the ground, and the Navy's main goal is fighting on the sea. So I suppose it could be said that the Air Force is the best environment to be in if you want to fly. But don't get me wrong, the other services need pilots too.

Let me know if you have any other questions.

US Air Force LoadMaster?

US Air Force LoadMaster?

1. Not bad. Good job with lots of travel.

2. 1 day to 2 years or more - depends on if you are there as permanent party or passing through.

3. Yes. Just make sure you claim what needs to be claimed with Customs.

4. Not hard, they teach you what you need to know and provide the tools to do the job.

5. On occasion aircraft draw fire during take offs & landings.

6. Depends why you are there - if permanent party you get days off - otherwise depends on mission schedule.

7. While you are in the Air Force or after you get out?

8. Different if married or single - recruiter can explain.

9. Yes - easier if you do it with the Air Force Reserves or Air National Guard.

Alternative suggestion - Aerial Refuel Boom Operator

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