Soul Food Month on June, 2018: What Kind of puppy food does Bichon Frise eat?

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June, 2018 is Soul Food Month 2018. soul food recipes Soul food recipes typically

Soul Food Month

The African-American culinary heritage is wealthy, enticing, and positively scrumptious. Soul Food Month can there be to celebrate this lengthy and varied tradition. It's backed through the Culinary Historians of Chicago, a town renowned for its comfort food institutions.The word “soul food” arrived to wide use within the sixties. It began out like a pretty reputation for dishes which utilized poor man’s elements like unusual cuts of meat or unpopular veggies. However, the inimitable African-American culinary art and knack for turning these unattractive scraps into mouth-watering hearty foods soon changed America’s look at soul food. When a euphemism, it's now a trademark for any dining knowledge about satisfaction guaranteed.Soul Food Month also reminds us to help keep traditions alive: many families celebrate with special dishes handed down over decades. Jump on the soul food train and participate in the culinary celebration. You can extend the month – you will need to!

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What Kind of puppy food does Bichon Frise eat?

All the foods you mentioned are very low quality.

Here are some GOOD foods appropriate for a puppy:

* Canidae All-life-stages

* Merrick Puppy Plate <-- This is what I use for puppy food.

* Artemis Fresh Mix puppy

* Innova puppy

* Chicken Soup for the Puppy Lover's Soul

(More brands further down in my answer)

Put the food down for 15 minutes, if the dog doesn't eat it, pick it up. No treats, biscuits, table scraps, etc. The dog will learn to eat when it gets hungry.

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Read the ingredients before you buy.

Here is my "short list" of rules when I am looking at dog food ingredients:

1) When I chose a dog food, I chose one high meat content. I want to see preferably at least 2-3 out of the top 5 ingredients be meat or meat meal (first ingredient must be!). Meal is simply the meat with the moisture removed.

2) I want to see higher quality grains, such as barley, brown rice, and oatmeal, instead of seeing wheat and corn. Or an alternative starch/carbohydrate such as potatoes or sweet potatoes.

3) I don't want to see any byproducts.

4) I don't want to see a lot of fillers.

5) I don't want to see preservatives that are believed to be carcinogens (BHA, BHT, ethoxyquin).

6) I don't want to see artificial colorings such as the Red, Blue, and Yellow dyes.

7) I don't want to see added sugars (sugar, corn syrup).

8) I don't want to see mystery meats (meats identified only as "meat" or "poultry".)

Here is an article about byproducts:

And an article on what ingredients to avoid:

---

Here are some examples of GOOD dog foods:

* Artemis Fresh Mix

* Blue Buffalo

* California Natural

* Canidae

* Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover's Soul

* Eagle Pack Holistic Selects

* EVO

* Fromm Four Star

* Innova

* Merrick

* Nature's Variety

* Orijen

* Solid Gold

* Taste of the Wild

* Wellness

* ZiwiPeak

Or check this website; the 4, 5, or 6 star rated foods are all good foods.

There is no food that is the *best*, different individual dog may thrive on different foods. What you want to find is the HIGH-QUALITY food that *your dog* does best on.

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Higher quality food may seem more expensive at first, but it evens out. The higher quality the food, the less fillers eaten (and therefore the less poop comes out the other end). Your dog eats more of a low-quality food to try to get the nutrition it needs, and most of the food just passes right on through. Also, higher-quality food will make your animals healthier, so you save money on vet bills in the long run.

---

What *NOT* to buy:

Stay away from grocery stores brands. They are low-quality foods chalk full of fillers, preservatives, dyes, etc.. (Grocery store foods are those like Beneful, Old Roy, Alpo, Pedigree, Purina, etc.)

Beware "premium" foods. "Premium" does not always mean high quality food. Most of these foods have the same types of ingredients as grocery store foods, just a bit better quality of those not-so-good ingredients. (Premium foods are those like Iams, Eukanuba, Science Diet, Bil-Jac, Royal Canin, etc..)

Another thing to be wary of: A lot of vets will recommend what they sell in their office. They get profit from the brands they keep on their shelves, that's why they push it. Truth is, vet schools don't focus a lot on nutrition. It's not saying that a vet is a bad vet because he recommends those foods, a lot of vets just are told "this is good food", so they pass the message along without proper nutrition knowledge. Also, some dog food brands (like Hills) support vet schools, so vets have heard of it from the time they start college, which makes them think it's good as well.

Hills company, the makers of Science Diet, are heavily involved in vet schools. "Hill's scientists author more than 50 research papers and textbook chapters each year and teach at leading schools of veterinary medicine" (Source of quoted section: )

---

When switching foods, remember to do it gradually by mixing the two foods together for a week or two.

.

dog food for cocker spaniel.?

dog food for cocker spaniel.?

There is no food that is the *best*, different individual dog may thrive on different foods. What is best for one may not be the best for the next. And just because a food is good quality, it doesn't mean it will jive the best for your dog.

What you want to find is the HIGH-QUALITY food that *your dog* does best on.

The following foods are some high-quality foods that would be good for your puppy to try. (There are others, too. These are just a sampling.)

- Merrick (any)

- Innova puppy

- Canidae (any)

- Wellness 'Just for Puppy'

- Chicken Soup for the Puppy Lover's Soul

---

Read the ingredients before you buy.

Here is my "short list" of rules when I am looking at dog food ingredients:

1) When I chose a dog food, I chose one high meat content. I want to see preferably at least 2-3 out of the top 5 ingredients be meat or meat meal (first ingredient must be!). Meal is simply the meat with the moisture removed.

2) I want to see higher quality grains, such as barley, brown rice, and oatmeal, instead of seeing wheat and corn. Or an alternative starch/carbohydrate such as potatoes or sweet potatoes.

3) I don't want to see any byproducts.

4) I don't want to see a lot of fillers.

5) I don't want to see preservatives that are believed to be carcinogens (BHA, BHT, ethoxyquin).

6) I don't want to see artificial colorings such as the Red, Blue, and Yellow dyes.

7) I don't want to see added sugars (sugar, corn syrup).

8) I don't want to see mystery meats (meats identified only as "meat" or "poultry".)

Here is an article about byproducts:

And an article on what ingredients to avoid:

---

Here are some examples of GOOD dog foods:

* Artemis

* Blue Buffalo

* California Natural

* Canidae

* Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover's Soul

* Eagle Pack Holistic Selects

* EVO

* Fromm

* Innova

* Merrick

* Nature's Variety

* Orijen

* Solid Gold

* Taste of the Wild

* Wellness

* ZiwiPeak

Or check this website; the 4, 5, or 6 star rated foods are all good foods.

(For a puppy, it's better to stick in the 4 & 5 star range. The 6 star foods are very high in protein and are not well suited for puppies.)

---

Higher quality food may seem more expensive at first, but it evens out. The higher quality the food, the less fillers eaten (and therefore the less poop comes out the other end). Your dog eats more of a low-quality food to try to get the nutrition it needs, and most of the food just passes right on through. Also, higher-quality food will make your animals healthier, so you save money on vet bills in the long run.

---

What *NOT* to buy:

Stay away from grocery stores brands. They are low-quality foods chalk full of fillers, preservatives, dyes, etc.. (Grocery store foods are those like Beneful, Old Roy, Alpo, Pedigree, Purina, etc.)

Beware "premium" foods. "Premium" does not always mean good nutritionally, and is not a nutritionally high quality food. Most of these foods have the same types of ingredients as grocery store foods, just a bit better quality of those not-so-good ingredients. (Premium foods are those like Iams, Eukanuba, Science Diet, Bil-Jac, Royal Canin, etc..)

Another thing to be wary of: A lot of vets will recommend what they sell in their office. They get profit from the brands they keep on their shelves, that's why they push it. Truth is, vet schools don't focus a lot on nutrition. It's not saying that a vet is a bad vet because he recommends those foods, a lot of vets just are told "this is good food", so they pass the message along without proper nutrition knowledge. Also, some dog food brands (like Hills) support vet schools, so vets have heard of it from the time they start college, which makes them think it's good as well.

Hills company, the makers of Science Diet, are heavily involved in vet schools. "Hill's scientists author more than 50 research papers and textbook chapters each year and teach at leading schools of veterinary medicine" (Source of quoted section: )

---

"Big box" petstores like Petco and Petsmart rarely have quality foods. (I do believe that PetCo sells "Solid Gold" and "Natural Balance" brands and Petsmart sells "Blue Buffallo", which are all higher quality foods, but most of the foods aren't.)

Also, grocery stores and Walmart aren't good places to buy food either.

Your best bets for getting quality dog food are:

- small, locally owned petstores

- dog boutiques

- farm supply stores

---

When switching foods, do it gradually. I do this over about a two week timespan:

25% food A, 75% food B

50% food A, 50% food B

75% food A, 25% food B

100% food A

.

Is this enough food to feed my dog...?

Is this enough food to feed my dog...?

that's a great food, we feed it as well to our great dane however you are feeding your pup way too much.

it is a high quality diet and therefore the dog doesn't need to eat as much. our dane is 9 months old and he only requires 5 cups a day. at 4 1/2 months old you should only be feeding maybe 3 cups a day. more than that and you are over doing it on protein & calcium which is going to cause your dog to grow to fast, and not give his bones and joints time to properly form before holding his adult weight.

you need to decrease the amount.

luckily we did our research and found this out, when we first got him we weren't aware of the difference in high quality foods and were feeding him 8 cups a day of eukanuba.. THANK GOD. we now know better and have switched all of our dogs to high quality diets.

brenna: thanks for the TD, obviously you do not own a giant breed. giant breeds should NOT be fed puppy food at all.

proper care of a GIANT (not large) breed:

Do not feed puppy foods; even those developed for giant breeds.

* Use a quality brand of dry food. Compare labels and get an adult food with lower calcium and protein content.

* Don’t add milk or dairy products to moisten the puppy’s food. Use warm water instead.

* Don’t give vitamins or minerals; especially calcium. The only vitamin supplementation considered acceptable is Vitamin C.

* Don’t let your giant breed puppy get rolly‑polly fat. You should be able to see the shiloutte of the last rib.

* Never make diet changes suddenly. Any change should be made gradually over the course of a week.

* Allow your giant breed puppy as much free exercise as he wants. However, never “road work” a young or adolescent giant breed puppy until their growth plates have closed.

add: yes it is okay to give treats, we give our dogs treats all of the time, but never human foods. we go to puppy bakeries and things like that and get treats that are main with wholesome ingredients or some great brands to get treats from are Canidae and Wellness.

she probably will be thicker since she is part bullmastiff but nonetheless they are both giant breeds, and her size and everything is already determined in her genetics. you just want to make sure she gets there slowly...very slowly..the slower your giant breed grows, the better.

ADD: vets do not undergo extensive nutritional information. (hence why they stock science diet and sell that crap *they get paid to) you should consult a nutritional expert and not a vet when it comes to food/nutrition.

To avoid upsetting your dog's intestinal tract or causing diarrhea, make the change from a puppy formula to an adult diet over a period of four days by mixing the two foods in your dog's bowl.

Day One: Fill your dog's bowl with 75% puppy food and 25% adult food.

Day Two: Mix the adult and puppy food in a 50/50 ratio.

Day Three: Feed your dog a mixture that's 75% adult food and 25% puppy food.

Day Four: Switch to 100% adult formula

ADD: oh she is absolutely adoreable! whoever said she was ugly is probably just not a fan of bigger breeds. she definitely looks a little thicker than a dane but again that's probably the bullmastiff, danes will get taller before they get thicker, so that's the real reason for having a careful diet, she is going to be big regardless, you just want to make sure that she gets there in a healthy manner. you will see her shoot up in size and then for a few months stay about the same and start growing slowly. for a while i thought my boy wasn't growing at all but he is already almost 32 inches at the withers and is 125 lbs. danes go through a linky stage where they look like they are starved because they are so tall but skinny, then they start to fill out, bullmastiffs get a little thicker before getting taller, so overall from what i see, she looks a little on the rolly polly side but still healthy, so just cut her food down a little bit, and put her on adult formula and she is going to be one beautiful pup, congrats!

here's a pic of my guy at 3 months and 1 week old. (36 pounds)

and here at 7.5 months (97 lbs)

Also on this date Friday, June 1, 2018...