National Raisin Week on May, 2018: 35+weeks and wondering?

National Raisin Week 2018. Keeping it Simple (KISBYTO): National Raisin Day National Raisin Day

35+weeks and wondering..?

Here is a list I found at babycenter.com I am also almost 35 weeks and I have been reaserching the same subject. Good luck to you and your baby!!!

Packing list for the hospital or birth center

Reviewed by the BabyCenter Medical Advisory Board

Last updated: July 2005

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Highlights

For labor

For your partner/labor coach

Postpartum

For your baby

What not to bring

You may want to pack two bags for the hospital or birth center: a small overnight bag for the items you'll need during labor and a larger bag for everything else that you'll need later. Here's a list of things that experienced moms recommend packing. You may also want to ask your caregiver, childbirth educator, or doula for tips on what to bring.

For labor

• Your birth plan.

• Your insurance card and any hospital paperwork you need.

• Your eyeglasses, if you need any. Even if you usually wear contacts, you'll probably need or want to take them out at some point during your stay.

• A hair band and barrettes, if you think you might want them.

• Lip moisturizer.

• A bathrobe, nightgown, slippers, and a couple of pairs of socks. Hospitals provide gowns for you to use during labor and afterward, but most will allow you to wear your own clothes if you prefer. Choose something loose and comfortable that you don't mind getting ruined. You'll need to wear a gown instead of pants so that your practitioner can check your cervix. Choose a top with short, loose sleeves so you your blood pressure can be checked easily and so you can slip your top off easily if you want to change and have an IV in place. You might also want to bring your own slippers and robe for walking around during the early stages of labor. If you don't want to risk soiling your robe, you can ask for a second hospital gown to wear as a robe to cover your backside.

• Something to read, if you're so inclined. One husband we know spent the early stages of labor reading The Lion in Winter while his wife read The English Patient. "In retrospect, I should have brought the National Enquirer or Vogue — something trashy with pictures," she says.

• Massage oils or lotions, music, an extra pillow, whatever you need to help you relax. (If you do bring your own pillow, be sure to use a patterned or colorful pillowcase so it doesn't get mixed up with the hospital's.) You might consider bringing tennis balls or a rolling pin in case you have back labor and need them for massage.

• Talismans, a picture of someone or something you love, anything you find reassuring. For your partner/labor coach

• Money for parking and change for vending machines.

• A few basic toiletries, such as a toothbrush, toothpaste, shampoo, deodorant.

• A change of clothes

• Some snacks and something to read during the early stages.

• A camera/video camera and film or tape or a memory card and batteries. Someone has to document the big event! (NOTE: Not all hospitals allow videotaping of the birth itself, but there's usually no rule against taping during labor or after the birth.)

• A bathing suit. If your partner wants to take a bath or shower during labor, you may want to jump in with her. Postpartum

• A fresh nightgown.

• Snacks! After many hours of labor, you're likely to be pretty hungry and you don't want to have to rely on the hospital's food. So bring your own crackers, raisins, and granola bars.

• A nursing bra, breast pads, and maternity underwear, if you'd prefer not to wear the net panties they'll give you at the hospital. Chances are, whatever underwear you do wear the first few days will get stained, even with sanitary pads (which the hospital provides).

• Toiletries. Toothbrush, toothpaste, hairbrush, lip balm, deodorant, and makeup, if it's important to you. Hospitals will have soap, shampoo, and lotion, but you might prefer your own brands.

• Your address book and prepaid phone card or cell phone. After the baby's born you'll want to call family and friends to let them know the good news. Note: Some hospitals don't allow cell phones to be used in the labor and delivery area, so you may want to ask about it ahead of time.

• A going-home outfit. Bring something roomy and easy to get into — believe it or not, you'll probably still look 5 or 6 months pregnant — along with a pair of flat shoes. The last thing you'll be worrying about when you go home is whether your outfit is fashionable. For your baby

• An infant car seat. You can't drive your baby home without one!

• A going-home outfit (one-piece stretchy outfits are easiest) and a snowsuit if it's very cold

• A receiving blanket (a heavy one if the weather's cold)

• A pair of socks or booties

• A cap (although they'll usually give you one at the hospital)

• Baby nail clippers or emery board. "The hospital where my son was born didn't supply clippers for fear of liability, and as a consequence my son gouged his face before he was 12 hours old," says Jen Morin of Vancouver, British Columbia. What not to bring

• Jewelry

• Lots of cash, credit cards, or any other valuables

• Work. Yes, we actually know fast-track types who have sent business e-mails from the hospital room, made work-related phone calls, and reviewed spreadsheets.

Raisins and Dogs......?

Raisins and Dogs......?

THANKS! This is important for every dog owner. I heard grapes are bad but I kinda forgot that duh... raisins are grapes so I could've easily thrown a few to my dog as a treat. It'd be great if you could find us a list of everything potentially dangerous for dogs. REMEMBER, ANTIFREEZE IS DEADLY FOR DOGS! We lost our first dog that we had for 12 years because we didn't know. No vet warned us. No dog care books we read warned us. Dogs are attracted to the taste of it so if you spill it, clean it up ASAP. Clean it up even if you don't own a dog just for other dog owner's sake. Thanks again for letting us know this. You may have saved another dog's life and saved some family a lot of heartache like we went through when we lost our beloved Sheltie, Violet.

when is the "chocolate day"?

when is the "chocolate day"?

January

3rd – National Chocolate Covered Cherry Day

8th – National English Toffee Day

26th – National Peanut Brittle Day

February

15th – National Gum Drop Day

19th – Chocolate Mint Day

March

3rd week – American Chocolate Week

19th – National Chocolate Caramel Day

24th – National Chocolate-Covered Raisin Day

April

12th – National Licorice Day

21st – National Chocolate-Covered Cashews Day

22nd – National Jelly Bean Day

May

12th – National Nutty Fudge Day

15th – National Chocolate Chip Day

23rd – National Taffy Day

June

National Candy Month

16th – Fudge Day

July

7th – Chocolate Day

15th – Gummi Worm Day

20th – National Lollipop Day

28th – National Milk Chocolate Day

August

4th – National Chocolate Chip Day

10th – S’mores Day

30th – National Toasted Marshmallow Day

September

13th – International Chocolate Day

22nd – National White Chocolate Day

October

National Caramel Month

28th – National Chocolate Day

30th – National Candy Corn Day

31st – National Caramel Apple Day

November

7th – National Bittersweet Chocolate with Almonds Day

December

7th – National Cotton Candy Day

16th – National Chocolate-Covered Anything Day

26th – National Candy Cane Day

28th – National Chocolate Day

29th – National Chocolate Day

Also on this date Tuesday, May 1, 2018...