National Nuclear Science Week on October, 2018: what are your thoughts about these two article about global warming?

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what are your thoughts about these two article about global warming?

You quote the same articel (by Botkin) twice. A nd neither rolling Stone nor the Wall Street Journal is a serious scientific cource.

Man-made global warming is demonstrably real. there are articles about it almost every week in the top journals SCIENCE and NATURE.

With over 90% certainty, global warming is real, serious, unprecedented, driven mainly by human activity, and requires appropriate action.This conclusion is reached even after taking natural variation, such as that connected to the sunspot cycle, into account. See statement at

endorsed by the [US] National Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Indian National Science Academy, , Russian Academy of Sciences, Royal Society (London). Over 40 other academies of national stature have issued similar statements:

(If links fail, cut, paste, and join up

displaypagedoc.asp?id=20742

and

_opinion_on_climate_change

#Academies_of_Science)

This view is based on thirty years of watching the evidence accumulate. Look in SCIENCE or NATURE, or even references in Wikipedia Global warming, for extensive real peer-reviewed scientific research.

See eg The Hot Topic, Dvd King, Prof. Cambridge (now Oxford); Global Warming 4th ed. 2009, John Houghton, Prof. AtmosphericSci., Oxford

See also the NSF report:

"Transitions and Tipping Points in Complex Environmental Systems"

through:

There is a lot of disinformation out there, and a lot of fossil fuel money being spent to push it. All too successfully, to judge from YA

Anything we do or fail to do takes time to have an impact, but whatever it is, the effects will be with us for a long time as well. So don't let people like some who post disinformation on this question distract you.

Possible actions:

Immediately:conservation. Medium-term, nuclear and renewables.

WARNING: some so-called renewables, like corn alcohol, release as much carbon dioxide as they save.

Long-term: serious lifestyle changes. Slowing down population growth. (Empowering women is the best way to do that - sorry if that sounds awfully PC). Possibly, CO2 sequestration and novel renewables e.g. algae, but those are still untested.

We need determination and patience.

Note on gross disinformation: [Wikipedia Fred Singer]. The Petition Project signatures on Fred Singer's site are unverified. Singer himself campaigned for years against the idea that smoking causes lung cancer, and the fuel companies (notoriously Exxon Mobil) have pumped millions into front organisations to create the impression that there is substantial scientific disagreement, when now there is not.

Amazon Gold Box

Important women throughout the 1960’s?

Important women throughout the 1960's?

1961 Women Strike for Peace was founded by Bella Abzug and Dagmar Wilson, initially part of the movement for a ban on nuclear testing and to end the Vietnam war. mainly white, middle class women staged a one-day national peace protest. . Its early tactics are very uncommon in the U.S. at that time—see link.

Sex and the Single Girl was written in 1962 by Helen Gurley Brown, 2 million copies in 3 weeks

In 1963 Kennedy's Presidential Commission on the Status of Women released its report on gender inequality, the Shriver Report,

1965 The case Weeks v. Southern Belle marks a major triumph in the fight against restrictive labor laws and company regulations on the hours and conditions of women’s work, opening many previously male-only jobs to women.

1966 Twenty-eight women, among them Betty Friedan, found the National Organization for Women (NOW) to function as a civil rights organization for women. The movement grew with legal victories such as the Equal Pay Act of 1963, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Griswold v. Connecticut Supreme Court ruling of 1965, and in 1966 Friedan joined other women and men to found the National Organization for Women.

1963 Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique is published, becomes a best-seller, and lays the groundwork for the feminist movement. Also in 1963 Alice Rossi presents "Equality Between the Sexes: An Immodest Proposal" at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences conference.

1964 Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 bars employment discrimination on account of sex, The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is established; in its first five years, 50,000 complaints of gender discrimination are received.

1967 Executive Order 11375 expands President Johnson's 1965 affirmative action policy to cover discrimination based on sex, resulting access to educational and employment opportunities equal to white males. Senator Eugene McCarthy introduces the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) in the US Senate. New York Radical Women is formed by Shulamith Firestone and Pam Allen.

Anne Koedt organizes "consciousness raising" groups. The National Welfare Rights Organization is formed.

1968 Robin Morgan leads members of New York Radical Women to protest the Miss America Pageant of 1968, which they decried as sexist and racist.

The first national women's liberation conference is held in Lake Villa, a suburb of Chicago, Illinois.

The National Abortion Rights Action League (NARAL) is founded by Betty Friedan and others.

Coretta Scott King assumes leadership of the African-American Civil Rights Movement following the death of her husband, and includes women's rights.

Shirley Chisholm is elected to the US Congress that same year, the first black congresswoman.

The EEOC rules sex-segregated help wanted ads in newspapers illegal, Women now are able to apply for higher-paying jobs previously opened only to men.

For the first time, feminists use the slogan "Sisterhood is Powerful."

The first public speakout against abortion laws is held in New York City.

Notes from the First Year, a women's liberation theoretical journal, is published by the New York Radical Women. Mary Daly, professor of theology at Boston College, publishes a scathing criticism of the Catholic Church's view and treatment of women entitled "The Church and the Second Sex."

Robin Morgan leads members of New York Radical Women to protest the Miss America Pageant of 1968, which they decried as sexist and racist.

The first national women's liberation conference is held in Lake Villa, a suburb of Chicago, Illinois.

The National Abortion Rights Action League (NARAL) is founded by Betty Friedan and others.

Coretta Scott King assumes leadership of the African-American Civil Rights Movement following the death of her husband, and expands the movement's platform to include women's rights. Shirley Chisholm is elected to the United States Congress that same year, the first black congresswoman.

The EEOC rules sex-segregated help wanted ads in newspapers illegal, a ruling which is upheld in 1973 by the Supreme Court. Women now are able to apply for higher-paying jobs previously opened only to men.

1969 For the first time, feminists use the slogan "Sisterhood is Powerful." The first public speakout against abortion laws is held in New York City. Notes from the First Year, a women's liberation theoretical journal, is published by the New York Radical Women.

Mary Daly, professor of theology at Boston College, publishes a scathing criticism of the Catholic Church's view and treatment of women entitled "The Church and the Second Sex."

Going to Japan with Ph.D?

Going to Japan with Ph.D?

You can probably get into a japanese university for grad school in a technical field, a few people i know have accomplished this without having anywhere near a full grasp of the language at the time of their application (friends from America, and one of my Chinese friends in Shanghai). They go there and were/are taking intensive japanese language courses (including technical japanese language), working in the lab and easing into subject related courses.

Sure, there should be some schools in the US that will let you have a semester or two abroad. I go to Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison, we have a strong partnership with Tokyo University for instance. Graduate students and faculty at least come to and from Tokyo once a year for a duration of approximately 2 weeks only, but something longer is in the realm of possibility i would forsee. Last year we hosted them, this year some of us go.

Graduate school curriculum in America still has requirements, but you can get away with tailoring things specifically to what you want to do (much moreso than in undergrad). If you wanted to go to japan, you could probably negotiate it with your department, and they can find funding for it, or you can find programs that will fund science/engineering students to go on study abroad terms like this. In this way, it is possible to find/make opportunities to spend maybe a "long enough" time to see if you really want to move there.

Extensions aside, what i know for certain you easily can do is get a summer internship at a company or university. I interned at a nuclear engineering lab in Osaka University; however, I was getting offers from a few universities (Tokyo U, Sendai, Kyoto, Tohoku). I chose to go to Osaka due to my interest in that specific research topic available for me to work on, among other reasons. I coordinated a program through Argonne National Lab, the American Nuclear Society, the Japanese Atomic Energy Association, and Osaka University to fund everything and a lot more. This goes back to what i was saying earlier, in grad school you can tailor things like this, and it will actually work out. And, i mentioned the multitude of universities that were willing to host me for the summer for the reasons of showing that it is not so difficult to coordinate something like this.

What is the job market out there for science/math PhD holders? That i could not say with such knowledge, most students i met were going for their masters and were trying to insert themselves into an industry position thereafter. I did meet a few PhD students, but never asked them this particular question.

If you get a PhD in america, or in japan, you can still work there someday though is the point. People on yahoo! answers tend to tell everyone how impossible it is. But, the point is, people should really speak for themselves, and not about what they do not know about. Engineers/scientists, with the proper connections, can get into the workforce there. I know a lot of people who have done it.

I would caution you about getting a PhD in Japan though, two americans i know who have completed their degree have frankly told me they felt "cheated" with their education in Japan. Japanese education is evidently not all popular rumor has cranked it up to be (i have also gleaned this firsthand, and believe me, it was hard to convince myself of as well). I will say you will be better off getting educated in America, you will become more capable of a scientist/engineer/mathematician. This is not to say that japanese are not capable of course, i just mean that their education is lacking when you compare it to say, good american schools. However, the plus side of being educated in japan is that you will have a wider access to more platforms in jobs, whereas if you are recruited from america your ability to locate a job will be more limited in scope.

Feel free to send me a message if you have any further questions. If people give you advice on here that stems from extensions of their experience as trying to get an english teaching job, do not listen. It is a whole different story if you actually have credentials/connections.

Also on this date Monday, October 1, 2018...