National Midwifery Week on October, 2018: Massage field decision. Help is appreciated?

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National Midwifery Week 2018. National Midwifery Week: We Love Our Midwives! National Midwifery Week 2011

Massage field decision. Help is appreciated?

The field of massage is extremely wide, and you will have to pick up many modalities along the way to maintain your license.

The best bet is to study first what will make you most employable after graduation, in order to capitalize your continuing education in other areas of interest.

Asian modalities are quite different from what most people are taught in massage school, even though you learn the basics for the national exam. Adequate training to make a living in the field can take years and a lot of money.

In addition, demand for those skills is relatively low in the Western hemisphere right now, so the cost benefit ratio is less promising. Every now and then comes a fad you can cash in on, so it doesn't hurt to be prepared... but I wouldn't make this one a priority yet.

Neonatal massage has one distinct advantage: babies are always being born. Massage is gaining acceptance for treatment of pregnancy too, so it is possible to keep the same customer for both modalities, and the bonding can be quite deep.

It's also good to have a plan B in case you become injured or unable to take a full client load. Many therapists combine their massage work with other skills - such as hair, nails, facials, etc.- because it's easier on their hands and diversifies the income stream.

I know a therapist who segued from massage into midwifery, which is a good example of a possible career path, if you are interested.

Just remember that in either case, you will need to get some experience and recommendations before striking out on your own. Make sure the necessary contacts are in place before jumping in with both feet.

In some areas, there is a glut of MTs, so pick your market with care or you will be blowing your wad on advertising.

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How much do homebirth midwives get paid?

How much do homebirth midwives get paid?

This is very variable depending on where they live & practise, and the demand for their services. Midwives generally set their own rates - there's no standardized charge.

In Queensland, Australia, a homebirth midwife can charge anywhere from around AU$2000 to AU$4000 total for care during pregnancy, labour, and visits up to 6 weeks after the birth. In some other states of Australia (WA), homebirth midwifery shared care programs are available at some hospitals, so costs are partially/fully covered. In New Zealand, homebirth is increasingly covered, and I believe all costs are paid for under the national healthcare system; so I imagine midwives get paid a standardized rate there. In some states like NSW, homebirth midwives are more common than in Qld, and tend to charge less - AU$1500-$3000.

If you're considering a homebirth, or considering becoming a homebirth midwife, it would be best to do a bit of research and find out what midwives charge in your local area.

:)Bronwyn

How do you breed dogs?

How do you breed dogs?

Well, you have to choose a breed. Then, find a breeder who breeds the type and temperament you want. Then apply for a show quality puppy. Then be accepted and purchase it and invest the training and money into training it for show (or working sports, if desired) and show it.

Become members of your national kennel club, for example, the American Kennel Club. Become members of a national breed group of your selected breed of choice.

Buy as many books and DVDs about reputable breeding as possible. Study midwifery, whelping and birth, stud keeping, semen collection, artificial insemination. Research your breed every day and become familiar with the different types and strains of conformation. Learn how to pick a show quality puppy out of a litter and determine why one would be a good breeding prospect at 8 weeks old and not her sister.

Start networking through Facebook, for example, with other breeders and breed fanciers. Start conversations or a FB breed discussion group and start talking. Join a few breeding or breed forums (there's many on the Internet). If you are serious about breeding, and breeding correctly and responsibly, dedicate the next 2+ years of your life to reading every day about breeding.

Get a mentor (a person who has been breeding breed of your choice for many years) who will help you choose a foundation b*tch and help you develop your own kennel.

Your foundation b*tch should have been purchased from a breeder who shows and sold her to you on a show/breeding contract. At 24 months of age, she should be checked by a veterinarian and x-rays taken of her hips and elbows if she is of a breed that has a tendency towards hip and elbow dysplasia. Get eyes, thyroid, heart, and patellas tested, if needed, and get a Brucella swab.

Find a stud for her who complements her conformation, temperament, and health. The breeder of your foundation b*tch should be able to point you towards an available male who would be a good match.

You can't just all of a sudden become a registered breeder. You need to stay in good standing with your national breed club and breed a certain amount of litters and/or Champions to get officially registered. And that doesn't come through putting your female pet dog together with any male who "looks good."

The only reason why people should breed is if it is their LIFE passion. If it is something you think you may be able to make a little bit of money off of, think again. My friend is a breeder and her last litter she spent $13,000 and did NOT break even, even with puppy costs of $1800. You may invest in your foundation b*tch, read everything you possibly can, have a litter, and then decide you never want to do that again, or put your beloved female through so much pain again. BUT, if you are so passionate about a breed and its future that you're willing to sacrifice the "now" for the "future," regardless of how much you've dipped into your savings, then nothing should be able to stop you.

Everyone was once a newbie. Do not stop asking questions.

Also on this date Monday, October 1, 2018...