League of Women Voters Day 2019 is on Thursday, February 14, 2019: What to bring on Election day?

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Thursday, February 14, 2019 is League of Women Voters Day 2019. League of Women Voters League of Women Voters

What to bring on Election day?

Check this website:

It's for first time voters in PA and gives you all the options re: what you can bring.... there are many options listed for people who don't have photo IDs. If none of these options work for you, don't give up! Call the league of women voters and they can help you about obtaining the proper ID (their tele number is at the very bottom of their web-page :-)

Even if you can't obtain proper ID, as long as you're registered you should still vote! You can cast a "provisional ballot" -- so make sure to go to the polls!

Congratulations on being a first time voter!! :-))

PS Don't listen to that nut above me... you are not allowed to wear any election gear for one candidate or the other into the polls!

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what did the women’s rights movement accomplished?

what did the women's rights movement accomplished?

Moments in History

19th Amendment Ratified

On Aug. 18, 1920, the 19th Amendment granting women the right to vote was ratified, 72 years after the struggle for women’s suffrage began. Of the 260 women that attended the first Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, only one – Charlotte Woodward – was still alive to cast her first official vote.

1837

First National Female Anti-Slavery Society Convention meets in New York City. Eighty-one delegates from 12 states attend.

1844

Lowell Female Labor Reform in Massachusetts demands a 10-hour work day, a decrease from the usual 12-hour day. In 1853, the Lowell Female Labor Reform won a small battle when the Massachusetts corporations reduced the workday to 11 hours.

1848

First Women’s Rights Convention is held in Seneca Falls, NY.

1866

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony form the American Equal Rights Association, where people of all races and both genders join to support universal suffrage.

1869

The Women’s Rights Movement splits into two factions over a fundamental disagreement: the New York-based National Woman Suffrage Association created by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton opposed the 15th Amendment unless it also gave women the right to vote, and the Boston-based American Woman Suffrage Association created by Lucy Stone, Henry Blackwell and Julia Ward Howe believed that all men should get the right to vote first and then women.

1870

Fifteenth Amendment is ratified, granting voting rights to all men without regard to race and color, including former slaves.

1872

Susan B. Anthony is arrested and brought to trial in Rochester, NY, for attempting to vote for Ulysses S. Grant in the presidential election. Anthony’s penalty was to pay a $100 fine – which she never paid and never served jail time.

1878

Women’s Suffrage Amendment is introduced in the United States Congress.

1890

The National Woman Suffrage Association and the American Woman Suffrage Association are reunited as the National American Woman Suffrage Association under the leadership of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr founded Hull House, the first of many settlement houses that encouraged all college-educated women to have careers in social work.

1896

Mary Church Terrell, Ida B. Wells-Barnett and former slave Harriet Tubman form the National Association of Colored Women.

1903

Mary Dreier, Rheta Childe Dorr, Leonora O’Reilly, and others form the Women’s Trade Union League of New York, an organization of middle- and working-class women dedicated to unionizing women and giving women the right to vote.

1912

Theodore Roosevelt’s Progressive (Bull Moose/Republican) Party becomes the first national political party to adopt a women’s suffrage plank.

1913

Alice Paul and Lucy Burns organize the Congressional Union (later known as the National Woman’s Party). These members use hunger strikes and picket the White House, among other forms of civil disobedience, to publicize the suffrage cause.

1916

Jeanette Rankin of Montana becomes the first American woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.

1917

New York State grants women the right to vote, one of the first to do so.

1920

The 19th Amendment is ratified. Its victory accomplished, the National American Woman Suffrage Association ceases to exist, but its organization becomes the nucleus of the League of Women Voters.

question on voting..?

question on voting..?

The League of Women Voters generally puts out a news flyer that discusses many of the issues prior to election day. Your state/precinct should also post a sample copy of your ballot online so you can research all of the candidates and review all of the issues.

Also on this date Thursday, February 14, 2019...