Diet Resolution Week on January, 2018: good diet

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Diet Resolution Week 2018. Bigelow Tea Begins the Year on a Nutritious Note For Diet ... Bigelow Tea Begins the Year on a Nutritious Note For Diet Resolution Week!

good diet??

Well, if you're going to breastfeed, it is not recommended that you diet to lose weight. In fact, you're not really supposed to "diet" until you're 6 weeks post partum. Your body needs recovery time.

If I were you, I would consider trying to eat a diabetic's diet. It's very balanced and encourages eating proteins with carbohydrates to keep your blood sugars from spiking.

How to stay motivated to get fit, and diet?

How to stay motivated to get fit, and diet?

Hey Naster,

Staying motivated while dieting has always been very difficult for me, and that has been the cause of every single failed diet I've had till now (of which there have been many!). However, I'm now on a diet which I see as a life-long project - my motivation is as high as it was when I started (maybe even higher), I'm losing weight, and for the first time in my life, I feel like I can finally get rid of the excess 80 lbs. I've been carrying around for years. It's hard for me to describe exactly how it happened - one short talk with my dietician (who I'd been going to for a year with not such great success) suddenly turned on a switch in my head and changed my whole outlook on dieting. I know that doesn't sound so helpful, so I will try to put in more concrete terms what he helped me with, why I was open to his advice, and how I continue to stay motivated:

1) Decide that YOU are the most important thing in your life - more so than work, family, friends or anything else. I'm not saying that those things aren't important - they are - but if you let them take over your life and drain you, you won't be doing them or you any good. Make a firm decision that before you take care of anyone else, you will take care of yourself. You will soon see that you can do both - and when you can't, no one will suffer too badly if you put yourself first. You WILL suffer badly if you put others first. I know that this sounds selfish, but it doesn't have to be. If you are a mother, you want your kids to have a healthy, happy mom, so you NEED to take care of yourself. Obviously, I don't mean that you should stop thinking about them or neglect them - just that you should make enough time for yourself to prepare diet foods, exercise, and just do things in general that keep you healthy and happy. Ditto for your spouse, parents, friends, etc. It's really a win-win situation, but it's often hard to get out of the sacrifice mode so that you can discover that.

2) Weigh yourself once a week. Not more, since weight tends to fluctuate from day to day. Not less, so you can see progress on a regular basis.

3) Find the diet that works for you. Not everyone is successful with the same type of diet. After years of failed diets, I discovered that I can only lose weight with low-carb diets. Some people react well to any kind of diet, others need very specific ones.

4) Vary your diet. The same diet all the time is boring and is one of the things most likely to lead to lack of motivation. I go to an acupuncturist / dietician (more about the acupuncture part later on) and he gives me a new diet every week or two or three (depending on my feedback and requests and overall success with the diet) - the diets are all low-carb, because that's what's good for me, but with enough variations that I don't get too bored.

5) Go to a dietician / nutritionist - but make sure that it's one on your wave length. I have found that it keeps me focused when I know that I have to report to someone on a weekly basis. Plus, it shows me that I am committed to my diet.

6) Avoid trigger foods. This is a hard one, but if you can stay away from things that cause you to binge, you will be much happier in the long run. I decided to ban all sweet foods, especially cake and chocolate, because they are my downfall. I won't even touch diet soda and other foods with sweetener because they give me sweet cravings. After a few days, I lost almost all my cravings for them. OK, I'm not saying that it's never hard, but I just keep on reminding myself that diabetics manage on a restricted diet - in the same way, I need to protect my health by losing weight.

7) Put notes in strategic locations around the house to remind you of your diet resolutions. I took yellow self-stick notes, wrote "Don't" on each one (short for "Don't eat ...") and stuck them on the microwave door, refrigerator door, chocolate cabinet door, and in a couple of places inside my bedroom. Now I don't need them at much, but at first they were a big help.

8) Read motivational diet books - not the ones that tell you what to eat and what not to eat, but the ones that motivate you and give you advice on how to stick to your diet. Two that I found useful are: "If I Am So Smart, Why Can't I Lose Weight?" by Brooke Castillo and "100 Days of Weight Loss" by Linda Spangle.

9) You may find alternative medicine works for you. Acupuncture (otherwise known as ear stapling) has really helped curb my appetite - and I was always known in my family for my tremendous appetite. For me, that has leveled the playing field - I finally feel that I can diet like everyone else, since before my appetite was so big that I literally starved on the diets everyone else felt fine on. I am not a big fan of alternative medicine in general, but this experience has convinced me that there is some merit to it - try acupuncture or anything else (e.g., hypnosis) and see if anything has a positive impact on your diet.

10) Find the exercise that works for you. I used to hate all forms of exercise until I discovered Leslie Sansone's DVDs. Finally there is a form of exercise I can bear and even enjoy at times! I tried many other forms of exercise until I found her, and continue to look for new things to expand my horizons. DVDs are not so expensive - it's worth the money and time.

11) Get good music for exercising. I used to hate walking on the treadmill - the other exercise I do along with Leslie Sansone - but I discovered that with upbeat music it was actually quite bearable.

12) Set an exercise goal. Then make sure to meet it, no matter what. My exercise goal is 15,000 steps a day (I wear a pedometer - more on that below), and I force myself to meet it no matter what - even if that means walking on the treadmill at 12:30 a.m. Of course, your exercise goal should be doable and not too overwhelming, but also not too small.

13) Wear a pedometer. I decided to try this after reading about studies that show that people who wear pedometers, set step goals, and record their steps are much more successful at losing weight than other dieters, and I have found that to be very true for me. 15,000 steps is a very high goal - start with 10,000, or even less - you might be surprised to see how few steps you take a day that you don't exercise.

14) Record your daily progress. I have a little notebook lying next to my bed that I fill out every night before I go to bed. Each page is just large enough for me to record seven days of progress - I have three columns to fill in - diet (I give myself a grade of 1 to 10), steps (how many steps I took that day), and extras (any extra exercise I did that would not show up as steps, e.g., abs exercises). Not wanting to mar my records really motivates me to stay on track!

15) Reward yourself. I cannot emphasize how important this is. I've made a list of all kinds of things that I want, and may eventually have bought myself anyway, but now I buy them only when I reach a certain goal. I give myself several types of reward - one is just for sticking to my diet / exercise goals for 2 straight weeks, another is for progress (every 10 lbs. lost), and a third is for doing X number of abs exercises since I really hate doing those and need the motivation to continue. I think that out of all the things I wrote here, this is the most important. There are many times when I force myself to reach my step goal just because I want to have a straight two weeks and reap my reward.

16) Allow yourself time off. There is one day a week that I don't diet (within limits - I don't pig out and I don't eat trigger foods, but I do allow myself carbs) and don't exercise. That is what I need to refresh myself for the upcoming week. Since I still manage to lose an average of 1.75 lbs. a week, I am not too concerned that that is ruining my diet.

Best of luck with staying motivated!

What helped you stay motivated to exercise/diet?

What helped you stay motivated to exercise/diet?

Staying motivated while dieting has always been very difficult for me, and that has been the cause of every single failed diet I've had till now (of which there have been many!). However, I'm now on a diet which I see as a life-long project - my motivation is as high as it was when I started (maybe even higher), I'm losing weight, and for the first time in my life, I feel like I can finally get rid of the excess 80 lbs. I've been carrying around for years. It's hard for me to describe exactly how it happened - one short talk with my dietician (who I'd been going to for a year with not such great success) suddenly turned on a switch in my head and changed my whole outlook on dieting. I know that doesn't sound so helpful, so I will try to put in more concrete terms what he helped me with, why I was open to his advice, and how I continue to stay motivated:

1) Decide that YOU are the most important thing in your life - more so than work, family, friends or anything else. I'm not saying that those things aren't important - they are - but if you let them take over your life and drain you, you won't be doing them or you any good. Make a firm decision that before you take care of anyone else, you will take care of yourself. You will soon see that you can do both - and when you can't, no one will suffer too badly if you put yourself first. You WILL suffer badly if you put others first. I know that this sounds selfish, but it doesn't have to be. If you are a mother, you want your kids to have a healthy, happy mom, so you NEED to take care of yourself. Obviously, I don't mean that you should stop thinking about them or neglect them - just that you should make enough time for yourself to prepare diet foods, exercise, and just do things in general that keep you healthy and happy. Ditto for your spouse, parents, friends, etc. It's really a win-win situation, but it's often hard to get out of the sacrifice mode so that you can discover that.

2) Weigh yourself once a week. Not more, since weight tends to fluctuate from day to day. Not less, so you can see progress on a regular basis.

3) Find the diet that works for you. Not everyone is successful with the same type of diet. After years of failed diets, I discovered that I can only lose weight with low-carb diets. Some people react well to any kind of diet, others need very specific ones.

4) Vary your diet. The same diet all the time is boring and is one of the things most likely to lead to lack of motivation. I go to an acupuncturist / dietician (more about the acupuncture part later on) and he gives me a new diet every week or two or three (depending on my feedback and requests and overall success with the diet) - the diets are all low-carb, because that's what's good for me, but with enough variations that I don't get too bored.

5) Go to a dietician / nutritionist - but make sure that it's one on your wave length. I have found that it keeps me focused when I know that I have to report to someone on a weekly basis. Plus, it shows me that I am committed to my diet.

6) Avoid trigger foods. This is a hard one, but if you can stay away from things that cause you to binge, you will be much happier in the long run. I decided to ban all sweet foods, especially cake and chocolate, because they are my downfall. I won't even touch diet soda and other foods with sweetener because they give me sweet cravings. After a few days, I lost almost all my cravings for them. OK, I'm not saying that it's never hard, but I just keep on reminding myself that diabetics manage on a restricted diet - in the same way, I need to protect my health by losing weight.

7) Put notes in strategic locations around the house to remind you of your diet resolutions. I took yellow self-stick notes, wrote "Don't" on each one (short for "Don't eat ...") and stuck them on the microwave door, refrigerator door, chocolate cabinet door, and in a couple of places inside my bedroom. Now I don't need them at much, but at first they were a big help.

8) Read motivational diet books - not the ones that tell you what to eat and what not to eat, but the ones that motivate you and give you advice on how to stick to your diet. Two that I found useful are: "If I Am So Smart, Why Can't I Lose Weight?" by Brooke Castillo and "100 Days of Weight Loss" by Linda Spangle.

9) You may find alternative medicine works for you. Acupuncture (otherwise known as ear stapling) has really helped curb my appetite - and I was always known in my family for my tremendous appetite. For me, that has leveled the playing field - I finally feel that I can diet like everyone else, since before my appetite was so big that I literally starved on the diets everyone else felt fine on. I am not a big fan of alternative medicine in general, but this experience has convinced me that there is some merit to it - try acupuncture or anything else (e.g., hypnosis) and see if anything has a positive impact on your diet.

10) Find the exercise that works for you. I used to hate all forms of exercise until I discovered Leslie Sansone's DVDs. Finally there is a form of exercise I can bear and even enjoy at times! I tried many other forms of exercise until I found her, and continue to look for new things to expand my horizons. DVDs are not so expensive - it's worth the money and time.

11) Get good music for exercising. I used to hate walking on the treadmill - the other exercise I do along with Leslie Sansone - but I discovered that with upbeat music it was actually quite bearable.

12) Set an exercise goal. Then make sure to meet it, no matter what. My exercise goal is 15,000 steps a day (I wear a pedometer - more on that below), and I force myself to meet it no matter what - even if that means walking on the treadmill at 12:30 a.m. Of course, your exercise goal should be doable and not too overwhelming, but also not too small.

13) Wear a pedometer. I decided to try this after reading about studies that show that people who wear pedometers, set step goals, and record their steps are much more successful at losing weight than other dieters, and I have found that to be very true for me. 15,000 steps is a very high goal - start with 10,000, or even less - you might be surprised to see how few steps you take a day that you don't exercise.

14) Record your daily progress. I have a little notebook lying next to my bed that I fill out every night before I go to bed. Each page is just large enough for me to record seven days of progress - I have three columns to fill in - diet (I give myself a grade of 1 to 10), steps (how many steps I took that day), and extras (any extra exercise I did that would not show up as steps, e.g., abs exercises). Not wanting to mar my records really motivates me to stay on track!

15) Reward yourself. I cannot emphasize how important this is. I've made a list of all kinds of things that I want, and may eventually have bought myself anyway, but now I buy them only when I reach a certain goal. I give myself several types of reward - one is just for sticking to my diet / exercise goals for 2 straight weeks, another is for progress (every 10 lbs. lost), and a third is for doing X number of abs exercises since I really hate doing those and need the motivation to continue. I think that out of all the things I wrote here, this is the most important. There are many times when I force myself to reach my step goal just because I want to have a straight two weeks and reap my reward.

16) Allow yourself time off. There is one day a week that I don't diet (within limits - I don't pig out and I don't eat trigger foods, but I do allow myself carbs) and don't exercise. That is what I need to refresh myself for the upcoming week. Since I still manage to lose an average of 1.75 lbs. a week, I am not too concerned that that is ruining my diet.

Best of luck with staying motivated!

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