Client's Day 2018 is on Monday, March 19, 2018: How do I get along with a client's dog?

Monday, March 19, 2018 is Client's Day 2018.

How do I get along with a client’s dog?

I don't know what sort of service you're providing these people, but clearly they trust you enough to let you enter their house when they aren't there. If they at least know what day/days you'll be coming, you could ask them to put the dog in a bedroom with the door closed, or some room that you won't have to enter. Perhaps the dog is use to a crate, and you could also ask them to crate the dog on those days. You should not have to deal with this dog, no matter what the circumstances are. Whenever anyone comes to my house to provide a service, even if I'm home, my dogs get put away. Your client needs to keep this dog contained......period. Ask him/her to do so. Things might not turn out so well if you end up having to sue him/her.

How to view a client’s activity on Server?

How to view a client's activity on Server?

G'day,

In the server station:

1. Right-click My Computer, select Manage

2. Click on Shared Folders. The three sub-folders under shared folders will tell you what you want, especially Open Files folder where you can see what files accessed by whom.

Hope this will help :)

HELP!! Severe separation anxiety in client’s dog!?

HELP!! Severe separation anxiety in client's dog!?

I have an article on separation anxiety

Here is what they suggest

Try to make your arrivals and departures very boring and low-key. Don't make a big fuss over saying hello and goodbye. Be very casual and up-beat.

Try to make interactions with your dog on your terms, not his. You pet him, treat him, or play with him when you want, and not when he asks for it.

Get your dog used to your getting-ready-to-leave cues, like picking up keys and jacket. Go through these actions repeatedly during the time when you're staying home, without actually leaving. If your dog has already learned to associate his fears with your departure cues, it will take a lot of repetitions before the dog will get it.

Give your dog more exercise. A tired dog is a good dog! A dog can sleep most of the day if he's tired enough. Most young dogs could use 20-100 minutes of full-speed running per day. Increase your dog's exercise. Don't forget mental exercise, like training, exploring new places, encountering new smells, and social interaction with other dogs. Taking your dog to a park where he can run and play with others may be crucial. (Find dog parks around San Jose here.)

Give your dog something to do while you're gone! What does your dog do all day- wait around for you to come home? Give your dog a hobby. Jean Donaldson calls the solution to a lot of dog problems "work-to-eat" programs. Stuff a Kong or a hollow prepared bone, fill up a Buster Cube or Roll-A-Treat, scatter the dog's food in the grass or hide several chew treats around the house (see the Merchandise page for a description of some of these items). A dog that is working for goodies is not barking or chewing, and a dog that is eating is not as stressed!

Don't draw attention to forbidden objects just before leaving - in other words, don't straighten up or point out the items that you don't want the dog to chew. Your dog might misinterpret your attention and give those objects his attention just because of it. In a similar way, punishing your dog afterwards for destruction he's done will probably not help - it will not reduce your dog's anxiety, show him a better way to deal with it, or give him an alternative behavior. He might not even connect the punishment with the action he did to cause the destruction. (Don't confuse a dog's "appeasement display", developed to stop threats of aggression, with a "guilty look" that implies a promise that your dog won't do it again. See the Body Language pages for more information.)

Consider crating your dog. Some dogs are more comfortable when confined to a small "den". Make sure your dog can "hold it" for as long as you need him to, and provide plenty of exercise so that his main activity in the crate is sleeping. You might just want to consider leaving your dog in one room (rather than giving him the run of the house), and maybe leaving a radio on and an article of clothing that smells like you in the next room. Warning: Some dogs are a lot less comfortable confined to a crate when alone. Make sure your dog is comfortable and secure.

Consider taking your dog to doggie daycare or to a friend's house (or to work or on errands with you), so that he is not actually alone, while you train your dog to deal with being alone. Remember, dogs are pack animals that want to be with others; being a "lone wolf" can be dangerous in the wild, as well as lonely. Note that for many dogs who have bonded strongly with people, having another dog (or other pet) around will not be sufficient.

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